!!> PDF ✯ The Shaman's Bones ⚣ Author James D. Doss – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk

The Shaman's Bones A Women Of The Tohono O Otam Tribe Has Been Savagely And Ritually Murdered In Wyoming, Outside The Jurisdictions Of Granite Creek, Colorado, Police Chief Scott Parris And Ute Tribal Policeman Charlie Moon But A Brutal, Unprovoked Assault By The Suspected Killer On One Of Parris S Detectives And The Dark, Unsettling Visions Of Charlie S Shaman Aunt, Daisy Perika Are Pulling Two Dedicated Lawmen And An Aging Native American Mystic Into The HuntDaisy S Dreams Of Raining Blood Tell Her That Will Die Despite The Healthy Skepticism Of His Good Friend Moon, Parris Is Inclined To Heed The Shaman S Dire Warnings But The Trail Of A Murderer Is Leading Them All To Perilous And Unexpected Places, Where Secrets Of Past Betrayals And Treacherous Tribal Politics Are Buried, And Where The Pursuit Of A Stolen Power Has Turned Some Men Greedy And Hungryd Deadly

  • Paperback
  • 352 pages
  • The Shaman's Bones
  • James D. Doss
  • English
  • 24 February 2019
  • 0380790297

About the Author: James D. Doss

James D Doss 1939, Kentucky, 17 May 2012 was a noted American mystery novel author He was the creator of the popular fictional Ute detective rancher Charlie Moon, of whom he wrote 17 mystery novels James Danny Doss was born and raised in Kentucky and died in Los Alamos, New Mexico He was also an electrical engineer who worked on particle accelerators and biomedical technology for the University of California s Los Alamos National Laboratory, while writing his novels After retirement from Los Alamos National Laboratory, he continued to write his popular novels while living in Taos, New Mexico and Los Alamos, New Mexico.https en.wikipedia.org wiki James_Doss


10 thoughts on “The Shaman's Bones

  1. says:

    If you enjoyed this book, fabulous Great Please don t read this review I m very forgetful, and if someone suggests this book to me in a year, I d probably take a look at it because I m a sucker for the southwest and a skeletal image So I m going to be very explicit.Dear Carol Don t read this I m not kidding You hated this book It s the kind of writing that will result in shouting, and the poor library book doesn t deserve to be thrown across the room The narrative is tailor made to make If you enjoyed this book, fabulous Great Please don t read this review I m very forgetful, and if someone suggests this book to me in a year, I d probably take a look at it because I m a sucker for the southwest and a skeletal image So I m going to be very explicit.Dear Carol Don t read this I m not kidding You hated this book It s the kind of writing that will result in shouting, and the poor library book doesn t deserve to be thrown across the room The narrative is tailor made to make you crazy Doss loves the third person limited perspective, and will change perspectives multiple times in a chapter I know you think I m exaggerating, but it s true Let me illustrate The first chapter has a weird poetic dream state description of the land, the dream of a shaman, then the perspective of a white detective, Parris The second chapter has a child, Sarah, and her memories of a dream when she was even younger then a perspective from her mother Mary and the dreaming shaman again Third chapter Mary, then Sarah, then a golden eagle I m not even joking , Mary, and then her husband Provo But don t worry Doss will drop the Mary perspective when she disappears and swing around to some other people Lizzie the bartender Sweetwater, the tribal chairperson Sargent Harry, Officer Trainee Alicia, and Eddie with the wooden leg None of these people matter at all, but it does take up at least a couple pages of space each It s like Doss is character padding his book.He also loves a portentous statement It s intriguing the first couple of times and to be expected as a hook But he does it every chapter, and usually at the end of every voice in the chapter To give him credit, is is an effective way of signalling the end of a character s moment Just how bad is it Quite Let me show you from the first two chapters Except when they are not and that s not even my ellipsis for spoiler And this is only the beginning And it won t be long in coming He shivered There werethan ten And then the shaman noticed this was a very small grave And it goes on like that for the entire book. But first he must redeem himself with his people Then his weary soul would long for rest And find none I suppose we need those statements to help us remember this is a mystery, because it is 124 pages before we find a body The lack of tension is notable as we are reading limited perspectives from the victim, probably the murderer never found out , the detectives and the accused murderer This is not one of those mysteries that will keep you awake.Speaking of sentence fragments I wasn t going to go into the structure, because normally I m not that person, but, wow I can t believe this was edited, or that Doss or the editor passed ninth grade English You are only allowed to use that many fragments and ellipses if you are writing a note to yourself, or if you are a deconstructionist post modern writer and I m not too sure about the former.I m also pretty sure you would have gone nuts over the white detective character if you had kept reading It got a little nauseating about the time the Ute shaman recognized that the blue eyed Wyoming lawman was a familiar sight around Bitter Springs The shaman s gaze paused on Scott Parris Now, this was a very interesting man A man perhaps who was touched by the Power again, not my ellipsis.Don t be misled by the marketing It s blurbed by the Denver Post with Fans of Tony Hillerman s Navajo mysteries will find a new home here No, no we won t, unless it s the literary equivalent of a cardboard box home underneath the 405 with diesel as air freshener Not that Hillerman was incredible but he was fairly solid and steady Doss s narrative is a hot mess, and I can t recommend it.Please don t pick this up again.HK,Carol

  2. says:

    I enjoyed the book I have been reading this series from the first book and will likely continue to the last The books are intricate and well crafted The interactions between the Ute Policeman Charlie Moon and the white policeman Scott Parris are interesting from a buddy standpoint T he heavy dose of mysticism sets it out as different from others in this genre Hillerman, Coel, Thurlo and may be off putting to some As I am Native American, I found it interesting The story is complex and t I enjoyed the book I have been reading this series from the first book and will likely continue to the last The books are intricate and well crafted The interactions between the Ute Policeman Charlie Moon and the white policeman Scott Parris are interesting from a buddy standpoint T he heavy dose of mysticism sets it out as different from others in this genre Hillerman, Coel, Thurlo and may be off putting to some As I am Native American, I found it interesting The story is complex and the crimes horrific The assault on the female police officer and the death of another officer could have been fleshed out a bitin the closing chapters Otherwise the book is a good solid mystery.I recommend this book to anyone who is interested in the Native American mystery genre I have one caveat If you do not care for a dose of surreal Native American mysticism, the book may not work for you I have enjoyed each book in the series a bitthan the previous book and plan on reading all of them

  3. says:

    This was James Doss 3rd book and this book has a slightly different narrative It also hasof a mystic flavor yet, at the end it all came together for a good read.

  4. says:

    I m stopping this author after this book the mystical aspects are too hokey and the story got confoluted.

  5. says:

    Love this series What a great author I m sorry I didn t discover him sooner.

  6. says:

    Enjoying the services very much

  7. says:

    I like Tony Hillerman s Navajo mysteries, and I love the red rock country of Southern Utah, so James Doss was a logical next author to read, and The Shaman s Bones was a good place to start The Denver Post says Hillerman s fans will find a new home here It s probably right Doss s characters seemactively mystical than Hillerman s, with dreams revealing hidden locations and spirit guides speaking in riddles But there s a beautifully solid grounding in humor and everyday reality Some del I like Tony Hillerman s Navajo mysteries, and I love the red rock country of Southern Utah, so James Doss was a logical next author to read, and The Shaman s Bones was a good place to start The Denver Post says Hillerman s fans will find a new home here It s probably right Doss s characters seemactively mystical than Hillerman s, with dreams revealing hidden locations and spirit guides speaking in riddles But there s a beautifully solid grounding in humor and everyday reality Some delightfully convoluted conversations reward the reader with laugh out loud insights, even as chapters end with dark foreboding and foreshadowing The characters bring and reveal their own different strengths and weaknesses, learningabout each other as the tale weaves on A small child is left in the care of Charlie Moon s aunt her mother and father seem to have disappeared Meanwhile dark visions promise death and dismay, and a woman is murdered in very strange circumstances Police Chief Scott Parris has his own reasons for listening carefully when the aunt warns of danger to come, and the scene is set The novel is relatively long at 350 pages, and the list of characters likewise, but the story kept me eagerly reading, and the characters stayed clear and well defined The scenery plays its own part too, with beautiful descriptions and atmosphere I was glad to find that there are manyShaman mysteries by Doss, and I plan to look out for them

  8. says:

    I thought this one was a shade darker than the later Doss books I ve read, but there was still the usual humor I ve noticed he does a lot of stylistic experiments throughout the series that aren t always appealing For example, this one has some really blunt foreshadowing as in he shouldn t have done that, and that sort of thing For an early novel in the series, that s understandable, but it s tough because you already know what s certain to happen in a little while and I prefer a lots I thought this one was a shade darker than the later Doss books I ve read, but there was still the usual humor I ve noticed he does a lot of stylistic experiments throughout the series that aren t always appealing For example, this one has some really blunt foreshadowing as in he shouldn t have done that, and that sort of thing For an early novel in the series, that s understandable, but it s tough because you already know what s certain to happen in a little while and I prefer a lotsubtlety I applaud the crafting of one particular red herring, a clue I thought was there and an allusion back to it that I was sure made it one, but in the end it was not a clue at all When Aunt Daisy takes a flyswatter to Charlie Moon for dismissing her visions and he s laughing the whole time she s slapping him with it, I can really see that happening That s a fine example of the two worlds Doss brings together in his books

  9. says:

    This was an appealing Southwest mystery Daisy Perika, aunt of Charlie Moon.a Ute policeman, has visions of brutal murders In her dream, it was raining bloodwhich meansthan one murder Charlie Moon and his friend in law enforcement, Scott Parris, end up taking several trips between southwest Colorado and Wyoming to solve this case Some of the characters in this book are intriguing and myserious The plot even involves events that took place many years ago 1938 Mysticism plays This was an appealing Southwest mystery Daisy Perika, aunt of Charlie Moon.a Ute policeman, has visions of brutal murders In her dream, it was raining bloodwhich meansthan one murder Charlie Moon and his friend in law enforcement, Scott Parris, end up taking several trips between southwest Colorado and Wyoming to solve this case Some of the characters in this book are intriguing and myserious The plot even involves events that took place many years ago 1938 Mysticism plays a role that you might not expect

  10. says:

    This series will help to fill the void left by the death of Tony Hillerman, one of favorite all time authors This series takes place on the Ute reservation in southwest Colorado Charlie Moon, the main character is a Ute tribal policeman In this book he travels to wyoming as he works on a case involving murder and a stolen Indian relic As Mr Hillerman did so well, James Doss developes his story while imparting a lot of information about the tribal culture, and with great descriptions of the s This series will help to fill the void left by the death of Tony Hillerman, one of favorite all time authors This series takes place on the Ute reservation in southwest Colorado Charlie Moon, the main character is a Ute tribal policeman In this book he travels to wyoming as he works on a case involving murder and a stolen Indian relic As Mr Hillerman did so well, James Doss developes his story while imparting a lot of information about the tribal culture, and with great descriptions of the southwest landscape

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