The End of Illness MOBI â The End Epub /

The End of Illness MOBI â The End Epub /

The End of Illness [PDF / Epub] ☂ The End of Illness Author David B. Agus – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk Can we live robustly until our last breath Do we have to suffer from debilitating conditions and sickness Is it possible to add vibrant years to our lives In the New York Times bestselling The End of Can we live robustly until our last breath Do we have to suffer from debilitating conditions and sickness Is it possible to add vibrant years to our lives In theNew York Times bestselling The End of Illness, Dr David Agus tackles these fundamental questions The End Epub / and dismantles misperceptions about what health really means Presenting an eye opening picture of the human body and all the ways it works and fails Dr Agus shows us how a new perspective on our individual health will allow us to achieve a long, vigorous life Offering insights and access to powerful new technologies that promise to transform medicine, Dr Agus emphasizes his belief that there is no right answer, no master guide that is one size fits all Each one of us must get to know our bodies in uniquely personal ways, and he shows us exactly how to do that A bold call for all of us to become our own personal health advocates, The End of Illness is a moving departure from orthodox thinking.


10 thoughts on “The End of Illness

  1. Lisa Roney Lisa Roney says:

    I read this book with some eagerness, as I m always glad to hear a whole systems approach to medicine However, I ended up being disappointed I am sure that Dr Agus is a highly intelligent man who has made strides in his field of oncology, but I am unimpressed with the job that his ghostwriter did The book relies very heavily on standard health advice get plenty of sleep and exercise, eat whole foods, try to be less sedentary, etc And even what s offered as new take baby aspirin and a stat I read this book with some eagerness, as I m always glad to hear a whole systems approach to medicine However, I ended up being disappointed I am sure that Dr Agus is a highly intelligent man who has made strides in his field of oncology, but I am unimpressed with the job that his ghostwriter did The book relies very heavily on standard health advice get plenty of sleep and exercise, eat whole foods, try to be less sedentary, etc And even what s offered as new take baby aspirin and a statin drug after age 40, throw out your vitamin supplements, and wear comfortable shoes are really not all that new If you hadn t heard about these debates and suggestions already, then you weren t paying much attention.That doesn t mean that there aren t good things about this book I celebrate any physician who is trying to focus on preventive medicine and who believes in empowering people with information about their health He is absolutely right that we need to do things differently in health care, and he has some good ideas about what some of those things are His orientation toward the wealthy and the celebrity aspects of his work lead him astray a bit But I do think his intentions are a step in the right direction.Still, for me, this book is flawed in a few important ways 1 The entire first part felt a lot like an infomercial for genetic testing Dr Agus admits that he is part owner of a genetic testing corporation, which he names, but that still didn t ease my sense of having paid for a book that was a big promotion for his profit making corporation It was almost as if they sat around the corporate board room and asked, How can we getcustomers Oh, let s put out a book that is really an ad We ll have profits from the book ANDgenetic testing customers And the thing is that Agus s particular corporation doesn t get good reviews online Wired noted that it is overpriced even compared with similar companies And most of us do not have health insurance that will help pay for it, nor do we have doctors that can interpret the information obtained Dr Agus s fantasy of health care that is tailored to the individual based on genetic screening is both futuristic and out of the reach of most people financially.2 In his chapter on tossing out vitamin supplements, Agus notes two things a correlation is not the same as causation and b animal and petri dish studies don t always apply to the whole human person I couldn t be happier for someone to say this Yet, as the book progresses and Agus turns to his causes, he uses the same kind of questionable study results as though correlation IS causation and as though animal and lab studies CAN be generalized to people There are many examples, but, for instance, on p 255, he uses a study of rats to claim that people need downtime Now, I believe in downtime, but this study doesn t prove its need He also does this with the issue of positive people living longer or surviving cancer longer a chicken and egg question if ever there was one And he notes in cavalier fashion that study after study shows that happier people live longer That does not mean, I will remind him, that the happiness causes people to live longer This is a classic confusion of correlation and causation, which he criticized before Maybe I m missing something, and I certainly don t have the same level of expertise at analyzing medical studies that Agus has But, something is inconsistent here.3 Agus claims that we need to become personally responsible for our health, and I am certainly a person who has years of experience doing so But he hedges about the need for universal health care While he does cite the brutal statistics involving our health care system p 296 297 , he also notes that we need health care reform at a muchbasic and fundamental level before we can get to the financial end of it p 279 I think he has it backwards In fact, Agus calls on all of us to gather our own health data and share it fearlessly so that large scale analysis of such data can be conducted That is a great idea, but it is not likely to happen as long as the health insurance industry is able to disenfranchise any of us at a moment s notice and as long as people are discriminated against because of their health standing, and, in fact, can t get independent health insurance with certain pre existing conditions Agus notes that many corporate fitness programs do collect data anonymously and preserve individuals privacy Would that I trusted that would always continue But I know full well that those policies can change with the political climate As long as profit is the motive for the health insurance industry, then some individuals will always have the potential to have their health information held against them To assert otherwise is unrealistic


  2. Anna L Conti Anna L Conti says:

    Too many words for too little info But the basic advice he offered was sound 1 Question everything, especially health news that appears in the general media, including online 2 Vitamin supplements are probably a waste of money for most people and might be harmful for some people 3 Michael Pollan got it right about food follow his advice 4 Wear comfortable shoes 5 Exercise daily and avoid sitting for prolonged periods 6 Maintain a regular schedule for meals, sleep, exercise 7 be Too many words for too little info But the basic advice he offered was sound 1 Question everything, especially health news that appears in the general media, including online 2 Vitamin supplements are probably a waste of money for most people and might be harmful for some people 3 Michael Pollan got it right about food follow his advice 4 Wear comfortable shoes 5 Exercise daily and avoid sitting for prolonged periods 6 Maintain a regular schedule for meals, sleep, exercise 7 be an informed consumer and take charge of your health don t leave it all in the hands of your doctor 8 Chronic Inflammation is the big enemy, that might be at the root of Heart Disease, Cancer, Dementia, and many autoimmune diseases He recommends taking statins as a preventative measure and he pushes them so relentlessly without mentioning any of the side effects of statins throughout the book that I started to wonder if he had stock in one of the companies that produces statins It was the one odd note in this otherwise reasonably good of health advice


  3. Kara Kara says:

    Absolutely the worst medical book I ve read Agus s suggestions include starting statins at 40, get genetically screened, avoiding wear heels, and reading Michael Pollan s book the only thing I agreed with, and he must have mentioned it 10 times Oh, yeah, Agus happens to be the owner of a genetic screening company And he never mentions that statins happen to have a whole host of side effects, some of which are not inconsequential liver damage, type 2 diabetes But who cares about credibil Absolutely the worst medical book I ve read Agus s suggestions include starting statins at 40, get genetically screened, avoiding wear heels, and reading Michael Pollan s book the only thing I agreed with, and he must have mentioned it 10 times Oh, yeah, Agus happens to be the owner of a genetic screening company And he never mentions that statins happen to have a whole host of side effects, some of which are not inconsequential liver damage, type 2 diabetes But who cares about credibility, when an author can just shamelessly namedrop instead See this Boston Globe article about how meaningless knowing your genome is anyway Unreliable narrator aside, this book was horribly edited Agus rambles in endless circles, contradicts himself repeatedly, and is, overall, quite patronizing in his tone Glad I can see through him The End of Illness can t even compare to similar books in this genre e.g., Groopman Ugh


  4. Liaken Liaken says:

    Hm Well, the paragraphs are very long and wordy, the examples are meandering and often not applicable, and he has a very hard time getting to the point I don t know how many times he would say things like, So, at this point, you re probably wondering what I would recommend, and then he would just blather on instead of saying what he recommended So, basically, the writing is bad In fact, the whole visual layout of the book makes it very clear that he is not trying to communicate a new parad Hm Well, the paragraphs are very long and wordy, the examples are meandering and often not applicable, and he has a very hard time getting to the point I don t know how many times he would say things like, So, at this point, you re probably wondering what I would recommend, and then he would just blather on instead of saying what he recommended So, basically, the writing is bad In fact, the whole visual layout of the book makes it very clear that he is not trying to communicate a new paradigm of understanding Instead, he s just listening to himself talk.Does he offer anything new and amazing Does he offer an End of Illness Not really He recommends routine, daily movement exercise, whole foods, reducing inflammation he s a big believer in flu shots and baby aspirin , paying attention to your body as a whole system instead of pieces things like that Oh, and to spend a ton of money to get genetic testing he is a part owner of a genetic testing company So, no, nothing very new or practical Alas For an excellent review that goes intodepth, see this review


  5. Jay Connor Jay Connor says:

    Here is one of those rare books that confirm your intuition while upsetting 50 years of conventional wisdom What is most daunting is that the naked Emperor revealed here is the medical pharma insurance complex This apparently wayward field is consuming ever increasing portions of our GDP while delivering diminishing outcomes We ve all heard of the disparities between US per capita spending on health and healthy outcomes compared to most of the rest of the developed world In End of Illness, Here is one of those rare books that confirm your intuition while upsetting 50 years of conventional wisdom What is most daunting is that the naked Emperor revealed here is the medical pharma insurance complex This apparently wayward field is consuming ever increasing portions of our GDP while delivering diminishing outcomes We ve all heard of the disparities between US per capita spending on health and healthy outcomes compared to most of the rest of the developed world In End of Illness, we see that this gap will never be closed if we continue to think about health the way we have been As with so many of our underachieving human endeavors of the past half century, David Agus describes a problem of equal parts frame and fragmentation In essence Agus is calling for us to look at the body as a system at our health, systematically Think of it as a delicate interwoven symphony of choice and genetics Seems logical and appropriate Right Except when you consider that every way we approach thinking about the body is fragmented and silo ed There are thousands of specialists, who study one element of the whole walled off from the unintended consequences of their good intentions Research especially the pharmaceutical pursuit of the next 1Billion drug is all targeted on the element and not the whole Even the way we keep medical data precludes us seeing beyond the specific This is the same problem that I have seen for decades in how we conceive achieving results in our communities or our schools.The frame needs to shift from combating disease to ending illness perfecting health The dilemma is that all of the rewards money have been set to the multiple interventions, mostly after something bad occurs operations, drugs, even vitamin and food supplements As in most western paradoxes, in order to understand why we work the way we do, in the face of suboptimal or non existent results, follow the money Sickness has manyinvestors than health Though Agus recommendations are important, I think the larger value of the End of Illness is that it requires us to marvel at our flexible, self correcting, human body and how it has been almost able to adapt to the harsh, alien environment of today s medical model


  6. Ann Ann says:

    What an annoying book Agus is a cancer doctor and named his book The End of Illness, so I had great hopes for it But he admitted that he couldn t really cure cancer or end illness Even worse, he wrote a book that read like a textbook, rambled like a boring old professor and offered the same advice we all heard from our mothers Obviously, we all feel better when we get enough sleep, eat a balanced diet and get regular exercise But, he actually said that high heels can lead to the kind of i What an annoying book Agus is a cancer doctor and named his book The End of Illness, so I had great hopes for it But he admitted that he couldn t really cure cancer or end illness Even worse, he wrote a book that read like a textbook, rambled like a boring old professor and offered the same advice we all heard from our mothers Obviously, we all feel better when we get enough sleep, eat a balanced diet and get regular exercise But, he actually said that high heels can lead to the kind of inflammation that causes serious illness He is also a big advocate for genetic testing, but of course he owns the company.Kaiser is big on prevention and has done a great job of making sure I get all my vaccinations and tests on schedule, another one of his recommendations He advocates statins and baby aspirin for everyone, but spends several pages denigrating vitamins I just found this book annoying, but I think it would be a real insult to anyone who has a serious illness through no fault of their own


  7. Yitka Yitka says:

    Boy, do I have some strong opinions on this book.What a disappointing read With a title like this and an introduction that promises to turn everything you ve ever read known heard about health upside down, I was expecting to be blown away by new, potentially controversial information about what causes illness I found very little of the sort I ll start with the good, though Agus sets forth a few intriguing frontiers of modern medicine that I wasn t aware of for example, he does a good job ou Boy, do I have some strong opinions on this book.What a disappointing read With a title like this and an introduction that promises to turn everything you ve ever read known heard about health upside down, I was expecting to be blown away by new, potentially controversial information about what causes illness I found very little of the sort I ll start with the good, though Agus sets forth a few intriguing frontiers of modern medicine that I wasn t aware of for example, he does a good job outlining the field of proteomics, the study of proteins, which are dynamic and constantly changing, unlike DNA, which is static Certainly, the possibilities contained in the future of this field are exciting ones, and Agus passion for and faith in the future of drug therapies, proteomics and genetics is palpable throughout the book On pg 259, he writes, The marriage of technology and medicine will be one of history s most fruitful unions I respect his message of empowering individuals to beproactive in their own healthcare, to workcollaboratively with their physicians, to become educated and stay skeptical of the many conflicting studies and inflammatory headlines surrounding what s supposedly good or bad for our health He does a good job pointing out how skewed and inconclusive these studies often are, and how the media can quickly twist a poorly designed study or experiment into facts about what s healthy.However, after alerting his readers to the danger of falling prey to this sort of information, Agus spends most of the book spouting out his own versions of it He discusses the difference between causation and correlation, then repeatedly cites studies or hypotheses that may well be purely correlative, but encourages the reader to then accept his ideas as truth He uses growing BMI rates as a sign of how unhealthy our society is becoming I wouldn t disagree that our society is becoming unhealthier overall, but I think BMI is a poor barometer with which to measure it Because muscle weighsthan fat, and BMI does not take body composition fat vs muscle into consideration, it s one of the poorest measurements of health and that s assuming that being overweight CAUSES disease, rather than just being CORRELATED to it.He makes several rather radical claims throughout the book exercising forthan an hour per day is detrimental to your health everyone over the age of 40 should be on statins e.g cholesterol lowering drugs like Lipitor or Crestor without including any actual information or studies to prove, let alone even support, this information He spends the majority of the book discussing how different doctors and research scientists have arrived at polar opposite conclusions on similar subjects e.g is Vitamin E supplementation a good idea and every other paragraph concludes with, This is too complex for us to really understand yet he heralds technology and further studies experimentation as the solution to everything I found this a little confusing, given how many examples he provides of the billions of dollars being thrown into studies experimentation that have done nothing so far but yield conflicting results often made murky by profitable interests He encourages everyone to kneel at the almighty altar of genetics testing, while admitting he founded a genetics testing company Good on him for the transparency, but it certainly didn t foster my 100% trust in the benevolence of his recommendations I will admit that I approached his book with a bias against genetic testing, but was willing to listen to the other side and be convinced of its merits I consider myself an open minded person who appreciates a good debate that challenges my understanding of the world I have allowed my mind to be changed by many arguments made for cases I originally did not agree with, or understand However, the most compelling argument he seemed to muster for genetic testing at least, at this point in time is, If you knew that your personal risk for having a heart attack in your life was 90 percent, you d probably do everything you could to treat your heart well True but I don t need a genetics test to tell me to treat my body the best I possibly can I m already motivated to do that, because I feel better in my day to day life when I treat my body well On page 79, he quotes the statistic that 73% of breast cancer is genetic, 27% is environmental Where does he come up with this number, which contradicts every other study or estimate I ve ever read on the subject He credits his source as Navigenics, his own genetics testing company Hmm then he writes that obesity is 67% genetic and 33% environment Again, where does these numbers come from Especially in a case like obesity which IS so clearly related to diet, does that 67% genetic stat take into account that our eating habits environmental are most heavily influenced by the families we were raised in Seems to be this would be a very difficult statistic to put a number on, given the causation correlation and nature nurture debates, yet Agus presents these percentages in a pie chart form he expects his readers to take at face value.He criticizes vitamin supplementation because it s deriving nutrients from artificial sources, then says one of the major reasons that we don t need to supplement with vitamin D, for example, is because most milk, juices and cereals are already fortified with it As far as I know correct me if I m wrong , vitamin D does not occur naturally in milk, juices or cereals vitamin fortification in processed foods is just as artificial as taking a pill Although I m not really a proponent of vitamin supplements, his reasoning against them didn t quite ring true for me.On page 185 187, he criticizes blending and juicing fruits, because he says that doing so creates oxidation and causes foods to degrade into chemicals we don t yet understand the effects of I was curious how blending a fruit would chemically transform it any differently than chopping it up with a knife on a cutting board, or chewing it thoroughly in our mouths before swallowing it, which no doubt would also create oxidation but Agus did not address this Instead, he concludes the section with, I hope you re not in a semi panic and thinking about what this means for other kitchen staples such as food processors, blenders Remember what I said in this beginning of this book a lot of of my musings are merely exercises in thought I m sorry, but what a ridiculous cop out for a doctor to make in a book that spends so much energy encouraging readers to bediscerning when they read that something is inherently good or bad for their health Yet, at the end of the chapter, he includes the following Health Rule Don t trust anything that comes out of a blender, juicer or glass jar What kind of a rule is that, if it s based on nothingthan his own personal, untested exercise in thought Personally, much of what Agus wrote just didn t resonate with me, especially when he makes sweeping claims about all of humanity He writes, We fail to eat well most of the time unless the fear of ill health and the desire to lose weight are great enough to make us choose quinoa over country fried steak Hmm I don t appreciate being told that my food choices are either fear based or vanity based perhaps I simply like the taste of quinoa better than country fried steak Perhaps I like the energy I feel after eating a plant based mealthan I do the lethargy I feel after eating greasy animal products He doesn t seem to take this into account, and just assumes that the only thing that will incentivize everyday people to make healthy decisions is the fear that a genetic predisposition to a particular disease might inflict.I don t doubt the sincerity of Agus and his mission to reduce disease rates in our nation But I felt that this book read primarily like a rambling textbook advertisement for his genetics company than the revolutionary read its title seemed to promise


  8. Keith Swenson Keith Swenson says:

    I give five stars to books that are not only excellent, but ones that I feel that everyone should read It is important.In a world filled with books attempting to explain simple cause effect relationships, Agus has the sanity to argue against reductionism that the human body is complex, and we should carefully assess all advice against your own experience Everyone s body is unique, and what works for one will often not work for another Far from dropping you into a sea of endless possibiliti I give five stars to books that are not only excellent, but ones that I feel that everyone should read It is important.In a world filled with books attempting to explain simple cause effect relationships, Agus has the sanity to argue against reductionism that the human body is complex, and we should carefully assess all advice against your own experience Everyone s body is unique, and what works for one will often not work for another Far from dropping you into a sea of endless possibilities, Agus provides a life boat of rationality and common sense to help you chart your own course.His assessment of the American medical establishment along with our obesity crisis is direct and lucid It is not healthcare, it is sick care Throughout the book a small price for taking care of your health will pay back many fold by preventing expensive and inconvenient illness To change this you, dear reader, must take control of your own health eat real food, exercise regularly, avoid vitamins and supplements, avoid sources of inflammation, prepare for meetings with your doctor, etc.Quite a bit is said about how ridiculous it is to take a single measurement, such as amount of LDL cholesterol, and consider a drug to be effective only on that one measurement Your body is a complex system, and everything effects everything It is a waste of time to look for magic bullets in medicine that address particular symptoms We need a NEW MODELInflamation is a telltale sign that something isn t right in your bodyWhile inflammation is the body s mechanism for healing, it is also by itself harmful, and should be avoided There are some inexpensive things that can be done with amazing results one baby aspirin a day for 5 years orcan reduce your chance of dying from cancer from 10 to 60% He also says everyone over 40 should be taking statins Love this quoteIt is important to approach your health in general from a place of lack of understanding Honor the body and its relationship to disease as a complex emergent system that you may never fully comprehend Most of his advice is well within the reach of normal people get plenty of sleep and surprising studies that show the health benefit of this Move and exercise regularly Keeping a regular schedule allows your body to maintain homeostatis which keeps you healthier Eat simple and fresh foods and how frozen is sometimes healthier than fresh food that has been sitting in the store for days He also has some thoughts about where medicine is and should be going More individualized measurements like the Quantified Self movement He is a big believer in the emerging field of Proteomics which he feels might be able to give us a better picture of how the system of the body is performing, and if done regularly over time could give you a dynamic indication of problems before you notice other symptoms It is not here today, but something I certainly am going to watch in the coming years.Most of all, I like his practical, pragmatic adviceBe wary of headlines that tell you what is good or bad for you Scrutinize data before you accept it as dogmaHe does not claim that there are simple answers, but instead encourages everyone to take an active role in figuring what is right for you There are tools that can help, it is time to start using them.Like I said everyone should read this book


  9. Lena Lena says:

    David Agus would like us to rethink our relationship to health In this book, he presents what he believes is a radical new approach to taking care of ourselves.The twentieth century was filled with powerful medical successes that were gained by drilling down and focusing on the tiniest pieces of our medical story things like viruses and bacteria But as we progress into a new millennium, Agus argues that our new advances will come not from looking at the pieces but looking at the whole.Cancer David Agus would like us to rethink our relationship to health In this book, he presents what he believes is a radical new approach to taking care of ourselves.The twentieth century was filled with powerful medical successes that were gained by drilling down and focusing on the tiniest pieces of our medical story things like viruses and bacteria But as we progress into a new millennium, Agus argues that our new advances will come not from looking at the pieces but looking at the whole.Cancer is one disease that has proven stubbornly resistant to the 19th century approach, and Agus uses it as an example to outline new technologies and ideas that he thinks can help us conquer this emperor of all maladies and other systemic health problems such as heart disease To anyone who has spent time dabbling in alternative medicine, Agus systems approach will not seem radical at all The difference, however, is that Agus approach is based on science and technology, rather that ancient mystical theories of holism.The topics he addresses range from the personalization of medicine and the promise of a future in which doctors will be able to use genetic testing to target specific treatments for maximum effectiveness to how aggregating and analyzing the hoards of medical data computers have made available can cause great leaps forward in medical progress.A good chunk of this book is also dedicated to the topic of prevention Science has figured out quite a few things that can help us reduce our risk of disease, many which will already be familiar to most people, but a few of which, such as the effect of statin drugs on inflammation, which were new to me.There is some interesting and useful information scattered throughout this book, but I did not find it to be the kind of riveting a read that the title would suggest Much in the portrait he paints of new medicine is still theoretical and, while interesting, not of much practical use As he writes, he varies between being too technically detailed and too simplistically repetitive I found myself experiencing modestly inspired hope as we described where medicine is headed, but the picture is still fuzzy enough that I walked away from this book without much to hold onto


  10. Jerry Jerry says:

    I found a few interesting things in this book There are some chapters that cover new developments in medicine such as personalized medicine, genomics, proteomics, effectiveness of supplements, microbiome enterotypes and cancer.Then there are some practical guidelines that you could act on Keep a strict, predictable schedule 365 days a year that has you eating, sleeping, and exercising at about the same times day in and day out Avoid napping unless you nap every day at the same time People I found a few interesting things in this book There are some chapters that cover new developments in medicine such as personalized medicine, genomics, proteomics, effectiveness of supplements, microbiome enterotypes and cancer.Then there are some practical guidelines that you could act on Keep a strict, predictable schedule 365 days a year that has you eating, sleeping, and exercising at about the same times day in and day out Avoid napping unless you nap every day at the same time People usually need 7 to nine hours of sleep, but regularity of time and deep sleep isimportant than the total time Even when you have a late night, get up at the same time as usual Set aside at least 30 minutes before bedtime to unwind avoid chores, work, computer, TV during this time Avoid random snacking Cut back on caffeine after 2pm Avoid alcohol within hours of bedtime If you can t eat at your regular time, have a healthful snack at the usual time Eat cold water fish a minimum of 3 times a week e.g salmon, sardines, tuna, rainbow trout, anchovies, herring, halibut, cod, black cod, mahimahi, etc Choose a multicolored diet Buy fresh vegetables that are really fresh, otherwise buy frozen Drink red wine one glass a night five nights a week, unless at high risk of breast cancer Reduce inflammation by wearing comfortable shoes, and getting an annual flu shot If over 40 take statins, and a baby aspirin.Sitting is as bad for you as smoking Get up and move as much as possible Get your heart rate up 50% for at least 15 minutes each day Find an exercise you like to do Exercise at the same times each day Don t exercisethan an hour at a time Interval exercise spread over the day is better than one session Ideally, a well rounded and comprehensive exercise program includes cardio work, strength training, and stretching


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