[ Read ] ➲ A Stillness at Appomattox (Army of the Potomac, Vol 3) Author Bruce Catton – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk

A Stillness at Appomattox (Army of the Potomac, Vol 3) A Stillness At Appomattox Army Of The Potomac, Vol 3 Free Author Bruce Catton Buyprobolan50.co.uk When First Published In 1953, Bruce Catton, Our Foremost Civil War Historian Was Awarded Both The Pulitzer Prize And The National Book Award For Excellence In Nonfiction This Final Volume Of The Army Of The Potomac Trilogy Relates The Final Year Of The Civil War.

10 thoughts on “A Stillness at Appomattox (Army of the Potomac, Vol 3)

  1. says:

    Appomattox, one of the homely American place names made dreadful by war Appomattox Court House has a homeliness, but Wilderness Tavern, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor the Virginia killing fields of Grant s overland push those sound entirely sinister And then you have the fight grounds and sites of massacre from three centuries of Indian Wars, which seem to fall on either side of a fine line separating the comical Tippecanoe, Little Big Horn from the weirdly resonant Fallen Timbers, Wounded Appomattox, one of the homely American place names made dreadful by war Appomattox Court House has a homeliness, but Wilderness Tavern, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor the Virginia killing fields of Grant s overland push those sound entirely sinister And then you have the fight grounds and sites of massacre from three centuries of Indian Wars, which seem to fall on either side ...

  2. says:

    This is the third installment in Bruce Catton s great Civil War trilogy Similar to the first two volumes, A Stillness at Appomattox continues the style of writing history for modern readers, concentrating on the human motivations central to important events These books are as readable and enjoyable today as they were originally in the 1950 s Beyond the broad appeal inherent in them, these three volumes, and especially A Stillness were important components in the mid twentieth centur...

  3. says:

    This is not a book It is a holy thing.It s holy for what it says, how it says it and how well it understands it It is not read, it is lived It is experienced in short bursts and set aside, so that you can close your eyes and imagine and contemplate and feel, and pay all proper homage as you try to grasp its enormity I ve been to Civil War cemeteries where thousands of headstones radiate in all directions, endlessly, but even that does not make me feel the accumulated weight of death and s This is not a book It is a holy thing.It s holy for what it says, how it says it and how well it understands it It is not read, it is lived It is experienced in short bursts and set aside, so that you can close your eyes and imagine and contemplate and feel, and pay all proper homage as you try to grasp its enormity I ve been to Civil War cemeteries where thousands of headstones radiate in all directions, endlessly, but even that does not make me feel the accumulated weight of death and struggle and pain like this book does.Bruce Catton felt the Civil War down to his very marrow It percolated and boiled hot in his blood and animated his very being It inflamed his imagination His love for it was passionate His rumination on it was deep and profound His feeling for it created electricity that shot to his fingers and moved them to write beautif...

  4. says:

    I re read this a few years back, and it s simply one of the best history books I ve ever read Grant s brutal sledgehammer campaign, Lee s ferocious response, it s all here, but written in a way that comes across, at times, like some sort of dark war poetry I think I saw on Goodreads where someone said that Catton was a historian with great heart I couldn t agreeAnd as a Virginian, I love the way Catton captures a familiar landscape, since I actually live only a few miles from the Chanc I re read this a few years back, and it s simply one of the best history books I ve ever read Grant s brutal sledgehammer campaign, Lee s ferocious response, it s all here, but written in a way that comes across, at times, li...

  5. says:

    I guess I read this book out of order, I didn t realize it was the third book in a trilogy That being said, it worked just fine as a stand alone book The last few months of the Civil War were really brought to life for me by this book sorry for the cliche phrase It s well written and reads like a novel, but it also contains a lot of quite interesting historical information I ve always found the Civil War a fascinating subject, and knew a moderate amount about it before reading this book, b I guess I read this book out of order, I didn t realize it was the third book in a trilogy That being said, it worked just fine as a stand alone book The last few months of the Civil War were really brought to life for me by this book sorry f...

  6. says:

    This is the third book of the famous Bruce Canton trilogy about the Civil War Published about 65 years ago it is much heralded and maybe the most famous telling of the story of the Civil War And I did find it mostly compelling reading although I am far from a fan of Civil War history The portions of the book which retold battle strategy and the movement of troops etc etc were most arduous for me And there was a lot of that But the stories about what was going on inside the heads of the pe This is the third book of the famous Bruce Canton trilogy about the Civil War Published about 65 years ago it is much heralded and maybe the most famous telling of the story of the Civil War And I did find it mostly compelling reading although I am far from a fan of Civil War history The portions of the book which retold battle strategy and the movement of troops etc etc were most arduous for me And there was a lot of that But the stories about what was going on inside the heads of the people was often compelling and fascinating The book is told predominately from the union point of view Which must be particularly irksome for southern readers But it just confirms what most everyone knows which is that the winners get to tell the story of the wars I have just...

  7. says:

    I read A Stillness at Appomattox while touring the Richmond Petersburg area at the end of May I now understand it took the leadership of a man like Grant to beat the Southern gentry of a man like Lee This was killing on a grand scale when the industial might of the North just out produced the South in everything from food to armaments This is a good book to read in order to understand the command structure, the middle leadership of the Army and the logistics of getting an Army ready to at I read A Stillness at Appomattox while touring the Richmond Petersburg area at the end of May I now understand it took the leadership of a man like Grant t...

  8. says:

    What can I say about Bruce Catton and this book I became a life long lover of all things history because of Bruce Catton I read these in my early twenties and I can still recall the sweet pleasure I got from realizing that history was actually FASCINATING when written by someone who seemed to sense the past as present Life changing for me If you would like to knowabout the Civil War and are a beginner I suggest you start with Cat...

  9. says:

    If their is ever again any rejoicing in the world it will be when this war is over That quote summarises the feeling of most of the people who fought in the American Civil War This is the third book in Bruce Catton s novels about the War Just for the record, I have not read the other two Here, the War has grown old and insane But what was beginning wasthan what was ending Lieutenant General Ulysses S Grant had joined General Meade and the Potomac Army He was the remorseless kille If their is ever again any rejoicing in the world it will be when this war is over That quote summarises the feeling of most of the people who fought in the American Civil War This is the third book in Bruce Catton s novels about the War Just for the record, I have not read the other two Here, the War has grown old and insane But what was beginning wasthan what was ending Lieutenant General Ulysses S Grant had joined General Meade and the Potomac Army He was the remorseless killer All the hopes and fears of the Union now rested on him He was considered another Napoleon who was going to win the war A new spirit was brewing among the soldiers The war was getting started Soon, the air was filled with a medley of sounds, ...

  10. says:

    The final book in Bruce Catton s excellent, The Army of The Potomac trilogy The story moves on with Grant taking command of all the armies and pressing down through the Wilderness a further battle at Chancellorsville, bloody fighting at Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor and into the trench systems around Petersburg Sheridan finally puts his army south of Early in the Shenendoah Valley, lays waste to the countryside and is finally able to rout Early s army Sherman takes Atlanta, Richmond falls and The final book in Bruce Catton s excellent, The Army of The Potomac trilogy T...

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