The Indian in America Kindle Ô The Indian Kindle -

The Indian in America Kindle Ô The Indian Kindle -



10 thoughts on “The Indian in America

  1. Bryan "They call me the Doge" Bryan "They call me the Doge" says:

    The Indian in America is part of the New American Nation Series, put out by Harper and Row from the mid 60s through the last of the 70s, and although this particular entry wasn t published until 1975, it s considered first in the series I put first in quotes, because, while almost all the other entries are chronologically ordered and cover much shorter time periods, this one spans the history of Native Americans from pre history to present 1970s day.After picking up many of the other volume The Indian in America is part of the New American Nation Series, put out by Harper and Row from the mid 60s through the last of the 70s, and although this particular entry wasn t published until 1975, it s considered first in the series I put first in quotes, because, while almost all the other entries are chronologically ordered and cover much shorter time periods, this one spans the history of Native Americans from pre history to present 1970s day.After picking up many of the other volumes in the series, I was eager to read this, as I was trying to read the entire series in order I m not sure exactly what I expected, but overall I was somewhat disappointed Can there be a one volume history of Native Americans I don t know how there were simply too many groups and tribes with so many wildly different traditions that any attempt but the most general survey would have to be split into several volumes And that is what this is a general survey, but one less focused on history than social and cultural trends throughout the ages Those ages can briefly summarized as before interaction with arriving Europeans the period when both groups were at a kind of parity and the period when the Native American groups were forced into reservation life.This may be the first book I ve read that was entirely devoted to this subject, so it s difficult to assess its accuracy this book was published after Dee Brown s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee An Indian History of the American West and Vine Deloria s Custer Died for Your Sins An Indian Manifesto, and also after the founding of the American Indian Movement It would be hard to believe that those landmarks events wouldn t effect a writer, though in exactly what way is hard to say I thought author Wilcomb Washburn given my inexperience with the subject matter struck a fairly objective balance when reporting the interaction between agents of the U.S and the Indian nations they dealt with Here I would like to re emphasis my inexperience with the subject Washburn does not dwell on atrocities, but he does not ignore them either, and whether his neutral tone is the right stance or not, I m unable to say One of the most disheartening events in the book, to me, were the efforts to turn the various tribal groups into settled communities that mimicked white settlements, once they were settled on the reservation It s certainly hard enough to read about broken treaties and outright massacres, but it seemed like an even deeper betrayal to learn how Indian agents and missionaries convinced they were acting in the Native Americans best interest stripped them of their cultural touchstones By the end of The Indian in America, I m left with the nagging feeling that, while it probably wasn t a bad introduction to the subject, its limited scope prevented it from being standout history I can t really blame it for not being the kind of history I was hoping for, but even judged by its own standards, I thought it was pedestrian I only hope, after spending so much time tracking down books from this series, other entries will beimpressive.A final note, having very little to do with the review After reading this review, some might wonder why I would bother with a fifty year old series in the first place, when it appears likely that The Oxford History of the United States will be the definitive history for some time to come First, I ve been collecting the Harper series for a long time, before I even was aware of Oxford s series So there is the fact that I actually have many of them on hand The second reason is, to quote C V Wedgwood, History reflects the period in which it is written as much as any other branch of literature A history written in 1970 will be different than one written in 2020, even if it concerns the same subject and the authors have similar judgments I think it will be interesting to compare them And thirdly, in general, non fiction written in the middle of the last century was held to a different standard than non fiction written today To compete with all the distractions, histories written today seem to me to have a lot of entertainment built into them, whereas histories written at the mid century to about 1980 or so seem to make fewer indulgences toward the reader Let me say right off that I seriously doubt that the Oxford history will have this problem But out of habit, I m drawntoward this earlier editorial style So, there you have it Hopefully later entries in this series will substantiate these points, though it s off to a mediocre beginning


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The Indian in America [Reading] ➿ The Indian in America By Wilcomb E. Washburn – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk Surveys the full history of the American Indians, examining Indian personal, social, religious, and cultural characteristics and conduct, their relationships with whites, and emerging new roles, ident Surveys the full history of the American Indians, examining Indian personal, social, religious, and cultural characteristics and conduct, their relationships with whites, and emerging new roles, identities, and goals.