Самотният бегач на дълго

Самотният бегач на дълго


Самотният бегач на дълго разстояние [Ebook] ➤ Самотният бегач на дълго разстояние ➪ Alan Sillitoe – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk Nine classic short stories portraying the isolation, criminality, morality, and rebellion of the working class from award winning, bestselling author Alan Sillitoe The titular story follows the intern Nine classic short stories на дълго ePUB ☆ portraying the isolation, criminality, morality, and rebellion of the working class from award winning, bestselling author Alan Sillitoe The titular story follows the internal decisions and external oppressions of a seventeen year old inmate in a juvenile detention center who is known only by his surname, Smith The wardens have given the boy a l.

  • Paperback
  • 166 pages
  • Самотният бегач на дълго разстояние
  • Alan Sillitoe
  • Bulgarian
  • 15 October 2017

About the Author: Alan Sillitoe

Alan Sillitoe was an на дълго ePUB ☆ English writer, one of the Angry Young Men of the s although he, in common with most of the other writers to whom the label was applied, had never welcomed itForsee.



10 thoughts on “Самотният бегач на дълго разстояние

  1. Evan Evan says:

    I didn t like him trying to accuse me of something he wasn t sure I d done They can spy on us all day to see if we re pulling our puddings and if we re doing our athletics , but they can t make an X ray out of our guts to find out what we re telling ourselves If you re thinking this is a sports book from the title, think again It s a compendium of short stories about lives lived in the mind numbing milieu and despair of lower class urban industrial Britain after WWII in the 40s and 50sI didn t like him trying to accuse me of something he wasn t sure I d done They can spy on us all day to see if we re pulling our puddings and if we re doing our athletics , but they can t make an X ray out of our guts to find out what we re telling ourselves If you re thinking this is a sports book from the title, think again It s a compendium of short stories about lives lived in the mind numbing milieu and despair of lower class urban industrial Britain after WWII in the 40s and 50s It is full of life and anger and sadness And the voices are vibrant even as they sound tired and resigned This comes right off the pages, in an intimate way Written in the vernacular and speech patterns of the locals These are honest and sad stories enlightening, heartbreaking, thought provoking Some of them have a wicked, subtle wit This is a splendid collection A great way to learn about that time, that place and its people The eponymous first story is one of the best things I ve ever read A lower class Brit punk without one shred of remorse for his crimes ruminates on life and class and the social order as he runs across the countryside while under lax watch from prison authorities who are grooming him for a track event He co opts it to turn the idea of victory on its head, to gain revenge against the system and win in his own way He sticks it to the MAN And plenty of irony at the end Written freely and it flows like a dream This sums up the runner s attitude I didn t like him trying to accuse me of something he wasn t sure I d done Published in 1959, this is prime time stuff of the angry young man Brit school of the period the title story was shortly thereafter made into a great film.These are all beautiful stories of loneliness, poignant resignation and longing among the working class Alan Sillitoe was and is an underrated master, and this maintains its place among my top 10 favorite books KevinR Ky, with slight adds in 2016

  2. Steven Godin Steven Godin says:

    Alan Sillitoe burst onto the British literary scene in the late 50s early 60s writing tough and gritty stories predominantly set in the Midlands amongst the working class poor, and dole recipients of a Britain in decline in the post war years Anyone familiar with the films of either Ken Loach or Shane meadows will know of the political messages, social issues, and harsh urban realism they deal with, and deal with brilliantly, Sillitoe does the same, only on paper The Loneliness of the Long Alan Sillitoe burst onto the British literary scene in the late 50s early 60s writing tough and gritty stories predominantly set in the Midlands amongst the working class poor, and dole recipients of a Britain in decline in the post war years Anyone familiar with the films of either Ken Loach or Shane meadows will know of the political messages, social issues, and harsh urban realism they deal with, and deal with brilliantly, Sillitoe does the same, only on paper The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner was also a movie from 1962, and based on his steely short story, it s narrated by Colin Smith, a young rebellious petty criminal who struggles to stay on the straight and narrow growing up in the poverty hit City of Nottingham Life is bleak, with little prospects for a decent future, and after being caught stealing from a bakery he is sent to a borstal Reform School To escape the restrictive circumstances of his existence he takes to running, long distance, and is really, really good at it, barely breaking into a sweat Sillitoe uses running in his story as a means of isolation Running is a solitary action and therefore allows Smith to begin to understand and become aware of the class divisions in Britain at the time The governor of the institution, who he dislikes, hopes to make an honest lad of him and knows he has it in him to win the Borstal cross country race But Smith has a different understanding of honesty than the governor and has no intention of letting him bask in his own reflected glory Smith knows he can win, easy, but doesn t play ball He never regrets his actions, believing it strengthened his independence and mind, even though it results in soul destroying manual labour.This story was one of a few included in this collection, all deal along the lines of how Class issues divided a Nation, you could even argue these stories are just as relevant today The writers in the angry young men movement Sillitoe, Kingsley Amis and others were angry because although living standards for the poor had increased drastically, the power was still in the hands of the elite.Crime was used as a weapon to gain power, police were thought of as the enemy, They used oppression against criminals to continue to hold power and enforce the divisions of class Characters like Sillitoe s Smith were born into a working class culture that accepted and produced a criminal activity The welfare state brought down the poverty rate this led the working class to often commit crimes out of choice rather than necessity Smith commits crimes to make a statement against the societal norms in Britain during the post war period At the end of the day, a criminal is a criminal, so it s difficult to be fully in Smith s corner, he wasn t mentally ill, thus it s a life of his own choosing But circumstance does come into play, If I were in his shoes, would probably have ended up the same way What other options were there left These stories feature the sort of situations a Brit will truly understand, politically speaking, Sillitoe really dug his claws into me, making me realize just how strugglesome places in England were at the time Unfortunately, problems still exist now, a housing crisis, the NHS at breaking point, and Mrs May is still all lost at sea over Brexit One can only hope for a decent outcome

  3. Annelies Annelies says:

    Superb collection of short stories Their power lies in the manner in wich they give you the satisfaction of reading, of constructing a story and give you the impression they have all the qualities a full novel should have There is a lot told in them without seeming over hasty A great contempt for all aspects of writing And yet they are so misguiding simple.

  4. Dan Dan says:

    I d say three stars for the title story, but two for most of the rest The title story, a long narrative by an angry, alienated young British man who s been sent to a Borstal a juvenile detention center intended to reform or educate juvenile criminals He is so full of rage that he deliberately makes a choice that is inimical to his own interests For me, it was a captivating story, although the telling of the story seemed old fashioned and slightly off putting For instance, the author s decis I d say three stars for the title story, but two for most of the rest The title story, a long narrative by an angry, alienated young British man who s been sent to a Borstal a juvenile detention center intended to reform or educate juvenile criminals He is so full of rage that he deliberately makes a choice that is inimical to his own interests For me, it was a captivating story, although the telling of the story seemed old fashioned and slightly off putting For instance, the author s decision to have the narrator unrealistically address the reader directly tended to break the spell that had held me to the story The rest of the stories are shorter and, to me, mostly not very interesting except as a kind of literary sociology and an introduction to British idioms I ve never encountered elsewhere To sling one s hook, it seems, means simply to leave a place, and in the Derby Nottingham area, one mashes tea instead of brewing it The author spells out dialect, a la Mark Twain, but for those who are not accustomed to the kind of speech these characters use, that s also a negative because it separates the unknowing reader from the story The characters are working poor, or often non working poor They generally engage in casual violence against women or children and often in casual theft as well as the not so casual kind Theft in these stories is not so much out of need or even out of the envy for glitzy consumer goods we hear about in America today, but for matters that are not forward looking candy or a ride at the carnival Sillitoe may be attempting to show the desperate straits of these people by showing us what he believes to be the consequence of the desperation self destructive acts rather than purposeful attempts to do better One trouble for me is that he does not really show the connection between living on the dole and the rage, or why his characters cannot engage in purposeful acts, even if they fail The stories seem to me to involve a lot of telling or narrative summary In some cases Sillitoe seems bent on avoiding actually showing us scenes that have a big impact and taking us as far from the drama as possible In one scene we never see, we re told that they fought like tigers In The Disgrace of Jim Scarfedale, Jim s wife leaves him, a turning point for Jim, but we see almost nothing of why she might have done so She reads books and wants to talk and he doesn t, but we really don t see this acted out It might be tempting to think Jim was too limited sexually when he s hungry, she refuses to cook for him, but invites him to crawl under the table and I ll give you something But if this line is meant as a sexual reference, it s not enough by itself to show that Jim is failing to perform sexually On the other hand, at the very end, without any preparation, we find that Jim does something to ten year old girls, presumably something sexual but this drama is so underplayed, referenced rather than played out, we can only guess what it is that Jim has done The same story illustrates other things Sillitoe does repeatedly to keep the reader from being too involved He tells his story as a frame story Disgrace is told by an observer, a younger boy, who overhears conversations So Jim s story is filtered through the narrator s report of what Jim said rather than putting us in the scenes of Jim s married life Perhaps for Sillitoe the real point isn t the drama of Jim s unhappiness and crimes but the story of the narrator, who takes a lesson from it all the he ll leave home soon s possible The trouble is that we hardly know the young narrator except as the eavesdropper, so his stated intent has no impact at all If that s the center, it is a soft center If, on the other hand, Jim is the center, why separate us from the immediacy of Jim life The stories add up to a dispiriting account of human beings who make little or no effort to deal with their lives in a way that would be useful for themselves The Fishing Boat Picture explicitly makes the sad point that the narrator looking back had failed to live, and it is to me the most successful story here after the impressive title story.I do not think Americans who read contemporary stories are likely to find most of these stories of interest but don t take my word for it, because others still regard him as one of the most important British writers of the postwar era That from the Guardian s obit in 2010 And he wrote some 53 volumes of fiction, plays, poetry and other items I cannot help but think, though, that some of the praise was based on appreciation for the social and political content Whatever you think of the writing itself, he certainly addressed himself to the lives of the downtrodden in post war northern England

  5. Kris Kris says:

    This is one of the best collections of short stories, by an artist I d never heard of, that I have ever read Sillitoe was born and raised in Nottingham, England, in a working class family At the age of 14 he left school and went to work with his father in a local bicycle factory The stories in this collection mostly deal with families like Sillitoe s poor factory workers living in cramped, dirty houses where the noise, soot and grime of the nearby factory is a constant part of their lives.T This is one of the best collections of short stories, by an artist I d never heard of, that I have ever read Sillitoe was born and raised in Nottingham, England, in a working class family At the age of 14 he left school and went to work with his father in a local bicycle factory The stories in this collection mostly deal with families like Sillitoe s poor factory workers living in cramped, dirty houses where the noise, soot and grime of the nearby factory is a constant part of their lives.The title story is about a young man Colin who robs a bakery and is sent to a borstal, a sort of part youth prison, part reform school The governor warden of the borstal gives him the opportunity to run cross country meets for the prison track team Colin is a good runner, and the governor thinks he will help him to win against a posh private school and get the borstal some good publicity Throughout the race against the private school, Colin is way in the lead, but he stops running shortly before the finish line, intentionally losing the race to show the governor he is in charge of his own life Uncle Ernest is about a veteran of World War I who has suffered a mental breakdown due to his experiences in the war There is an almost childlike innocence to him when he meets two young girls at a diner, obviously poor and hungry, he offers to buy them something to eat He continues to meet the girls at the diner, and the older of the two begins taking advantage of his innocence, getting him to buy them other things Unfortunately, Ernest s motives are misunderstood by other patrons of the diner they and the police assume he is a pervert, and warn him away from the girls.I enjoyed all the stories in this volume, but I think my favorite was The Decline and Fall of Frankie Buller Frankie is a young man of about twenty, who has the mental capacity of a younger boy he acts as general though he prefers to be called sergeant major in the neighborhood boys skirmishes with other groups of boys World War II is approaching, and Frankie assumes that when the war starts, he ll go to join his father s regiment obviously, when the war does begin, he is rejected for service and ends up assisting the local civil defense patrols This story is obviously at least partially autobiographical Frankie addresses the narrator as Alan , and Alan is a writer of stories about his old neighborhood Sillitoe uses the story to reminisce about his own childhood and to express regret over having moved on to be a well known writer who seems to have lost touch with his roots.Reviewers have compared this book to The Catcher in the Rye, calling Colin a British Holden Caulfield It s easily one of the best collections of short stories I ve ever read

  6. Sam Sam says:

    I want to qualify this rating by saying that the title story in this collection is fantastic, and a few of the others were lovely in their own way But there s a feeling of smallness in these stories, and the characters with the notable exception of the runner in the first story tend to get crushed under the wheel of plot machinations Especially for a writer who s acclaimed for giving life to working class protagonists who usually get ignored in british lit, it seems like he doesn t have a I want to qualify this rating by saying that the title story in this collection is fantastic, and a few of the others were lovely in their own way But there s a feeling of smallness in these stories, and the characters with the notable exception of the runner in the first story tend to get crushed under the wheel of plot machinations Especially for a writer who s acclaimed for giving life to working class protagonists who usually get ignored in british lit, it seems like he doesn t have a lot of sympathy for his own creations As part of the Angry Young Men who redefined British culture in the fifties, Sillitoe must have been pretty important in his day, but now what we have folks like Roddy Doyle and tons of dialect novels, Sillitoe seems a little quaint But read the title story, it s great, and it gives you a feeling of wanting to punch a cop, which is a feeling that I think ought to be felt by everyone, at least once in a while

  7. Alison Alison says:

    Some of these stories of working class lives in the first half of the 20th century almost made me cry This is one of the saddest books I have ever read not because it contains so much misery but rather because it is so brilliantly described that it feels so real Reading this book it s also amazing to think how much life in Britain has changed over the past fifty years From leaving school at fourteen to get a series of jobs in factories, to playing with sticks and stones and climbing walls be Some of these stories of working class lives in the first half of the 20th century almost made me cry This is one of the saddest books I have ever read not because it contains so much misery but rather because it is so brilliantly described that it feels so real Reading this book it s also amazing to think how much life in Britain has changed over the past fifty years From leaving school at fourteen to get a series of jobs in factories, to playing with sticks and stones and climbing walls because there were no toys or anything else to do, to having to join the army to fight in WWII, the lives of the characters in these stories seem a million miles away from my own, and yet in reality they were just just my grandparents and parents generation It did make me wonder about the way my parents grew up, and also if my childhood will prove to be so distant and unknown to the next generation

  8. Nick Pageant Nick Pageant says:

    I found this to be a rough go Excellently done but comes off strangely dated.

  9. Jeff Scott Jeff Scott says:

    RunnerVery bleak stories dealing with loneliness and desperation They are beautiful and well rounded stories that at times reminded me of Winesburg, Ohio.A young man takes to long distance running to escape life in juvenile detention The officials praise how his participation has turned him around, but the runner proves they can t control him.An old man buys lunch for two girls just so he won t be alone An ex wife keeps asking for her husbands favorite picture, just to see him buy it back fro RunnerVery bleak stories dealing with loneliness and desperation They are beautiful and well rounded stories that at times reminded me of Winesburg, Ohio.A young man takes to long distance running to escape life in juvenile detention The officials praise how his participation has turned him around, but the runner proves they can t control him.An old man buys lunch for two girls just so he won t be alone An ex wife keeps asking for her husbands favorite picture, just to see him buy it back from a pawn shop Other stories of youths trying to break away out of their poverty only to end up in worse circumstances Some find small victories, the runner finds freedom when he is alone like he is the last man on earth, another lives in a fantasy world where he leads his troops into battle, but they are only schoolboys.All heartbreaking stories but almost all find a way where they have their freedom, something that cannot be controlled, their will.winning means the exact opposite, no matter how hard they try to kill or kid me, means running right into their white gloved wall barred hands and grinning mugs and staying there for the rest of my natural long life of stone breaking anyway, but stone breaking in the way I want to do it and not in the way they tell me P 45I was born dead, I keep telling myself Everybody s dead, I answer So they are, I maintain, but then most of them never know it like I m beginning to do, and it s a bloody shame that this has come to me at last when I could at least do with it, and when it s too bloody late to get anything bad from it Then optimism rides out of the darkness like a knight in armour If you loved her of course I bloody well did then you both did the only thing possible if it was to be remembered as love Now didn t you Knight in armour goes back into blackness Yes, I cry, but neither of us did anything about it, and that s the trouble P 99

  10. Martin Martin says:

    The 1962 film Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner is my favorite of the British New Wave, which is why a friend lent me this short story collection I love the Northern accent and slang, so I often read very slowly in order to absorb as much as I could This volume was a perfect encapsulation of a specific time and place, northern England before and a bit after the war The language was evocative and I could picture everything perfectly It s a wonderof these stories weren t translate The 1962 film Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner is my favorite of the British New Wave, which is why a friend lent me this short story collection I love the Northern accent and slang, so I often read very slowly in order to absorb as much as I could This volume was a perfect encapsulation of a specific time and place, northern England before and a bit after the war The language was evocative and I could picture everything perfectly It s a wonderof these stories weren t translated to film or TV I m going to rate each story individually Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner 5 stars This story is the longest and delves deepest into its narrator s psyche, yet it was not my favorite of the bunch The main difference between this story and the film is that in the story we are told immediately that Smith is going to throw the race Viewing the film, we do not know for sure this will happen, and as a bourgeois audience we often side with the people in charge at Borstal, who we think may not be quite as bad as Smith believes, and we see the runners from the public school as not a bad lot, and we want Smith to overcome his circumstances a very bourgeois attitude indeed I feel that this compromises the original intent of the story, but the story and film are both great on their own divergent terms Uncle Ernest 4 stars A quick, sad little story about a lonely man who gives too much attention to a couple of hungry girls Mr Raynor the Schoolteacher 3 stars Sort of a one note story the teacher can t discipline his class because he is distracted by the young ladies working at the shop across the road There is a pretty good twist, however The Fishing Boat Picture 5 stars Portrait of a discarded marriage and a coveted picture over the years We see the wife on the decline, but we, and the ex husband, view her with a degree of detachment that prevents us from getting too sad, a very neat trick on the author s part Noah s Ark 5 stars A story of action with little time for pondering Our narrator is the less experienced of two boys go to a local fair on the cheap Filled with suspense, and the author is as adept at navigating the physics of carnival rides as theexperienced boy Completely took me back to that age when I was venturing further from home with daring and adventure On Saturday Afternoon 5 stars One of my favorite short stories of all time It had me cracking up, though I wonder how funny the author intended it to be I have a rather dark sense of humor A boy in his mid to late teens tells a story about when he was 10 and tried to help a man commit suicide The boy can be quite blunt due to his innocence, yet is also quite world wise, or world weary, due to the harsh nature of his home life, the harshest of which is the congenitally depressive and temperamental personality of his family On a deeper level, the story also asks whether the state grants a poor person the liberty to do with his life as he wishes The Match 3 stars Rather obvious portrait of two marriages in different phases of their life cycles Correct me if I m wrong The Disgrace of Jim Scarfedale 5 stars Another terrific story told from the point of view of a young lad with a wry sense of humor, this time coming for the close quarters of his street and lack of privacy, making his viewpointobservational than editorial Although he does say a lot of I could have told him THAT, which makes me laugh It s kind of hard not to laugh at one s neighbors when one is always aware of them The Decline and Fall of Frankie Buller 5 stars I don t know why this hasn t been made into a film A great story about an oversize 20 to 25 year old kid who leads battle against the housing development meant to relocate slum families out of the city, right as WWII is about to start The beautiful ending to this story also acts as a sad farewell to this collection.I was going to give this book 4 stars because not every story was 5 stars, but after reviewing each story, I have to give it 5 This is in my top 5 short story collections, for sure

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