The Evergreen in red and white PDF/EPUB ¶ in red

The Evergreen in red and white PDF/EPUB ¶ in red



10 thoughts on “The Evergreen in red and white

  1. Rob Rob says:

    I have devoted some attention before on a call for a great football novel , something to plug a gap which cricket and baseball in particular have filledsuccessfully a solution to the presumption that football as narrative is somehow unsuited to literary treatment To date, despite a number of brave attempts, no one book has managed to grab the attention of the Books establishment.Unfortunately, Steven Kay s meticulously researched novel, The Evergreen in Red and White is probably not go I have devoted some attention before on a call for a great football novel , something to plug a gap which cricket and baseball in particular have filledsuccessfully a solution to the presumption that football as narrative is somehow unsuited to literary treatment To date, despite a number of brave attempts, no one book has managed to grab the attention of the Books establishment.Unfortunately, Steven Kay s meticulously researched novel, The Evergreen in Red and White is probably not going to change that a self published effort via 1889 Books, it s unlikely to become a cause c l bre amid Soho cafes That, however, is no reflection on the quality of the book for Kay s is a remarkable achievement.The author follows in the footsteps of the unofficial scribe of the Victorian era in football Paul Brown, by recreating a vivid portrait of the year of Queen Victoria s Diamond Jubilee in 1897, a working class world at some remove from the fin de si cle milieu of Oscar Wilde, permeated with fine period detail and closely tracking a season in the life of Sheffield United midfielder Rab Howell.Kay wisely keeps descriptions of the on pitch action to a minimum, choosing instead to concentrate on the hero s home life and constructing a narrative based on the humdrum and consequent infidelity In this, there are strong parallels to Robert Tressell s magisterial description of working class life of the age, The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists.So we are treated to a familiar litany of now departed motifs bread and dripping, the belching coke plants of the industrial city, blood and thunder religion, trips to the fairground and the absent charm of the bourgeoisie phenomena that were arguably still present among the generation immediately prior to our own before being swept away by the consumerism and compromised prosperity of the late twentieth century.But where Kay s novel really comes into its own is in the fascinating portrait of Howell as a man of Romany stock The glossary of terms that accompanies the text is of real help and teases the reader into finding outof the culture and its antecedents, often buried in the midst of time but Howell is as much a Yorkshireman as he is an Egyptian as the Gorgio those of non Romany background folk he interacts with would wrongly assume.The whole is an intriguing glimpse into an environment at the intersection of two cultures while the football world is inevitably also very different Sheffield United and Wednesday are Lane ites and Grove ites respectively, Liverpool play in blue and white, Sunderland fans are portrayed as the biggest nutters and players travel to games via train given this was an era before mass production of the motor car.As the book draws to a close, Howell s off pitch antics inevitably land him in hot water although he remains sympathetic and one suspects that had age and injuries been on his side, his failure to stay on the straight and narrow might have been overlooked Still, the prospect of returning to the pithead at the end of one s playing days was an overwhelming prospect at the time and Kay skilfully allows us into the mind of a footballer torn between duty and emotion This is a novel that should not be overlooked


  2. Joy Lo-Bamijoko Joy Lo-Bamijoko says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Wow What a dramatic ending to this story I didn t know that Rab will eventually pull it off I was actually rooting for Selina, and hoping that she will come to realize that it is never a good idea to live with one s husband in ones parent s house That was a license for failure The book started with a couple of pages solely on football, with jargons completely alien to a non professional, and a modus parlando, a speaking style, that was hard to follow, interspersed with foreign words that we Wow What a dramatic ending to this story I didn t know that Rab will eventually pull it off I was actually rooting for Selina, and hoping that she will come to realize that it is never a good idea to live with one s husband in ones parent s house That was a license for failure The book started with a couple of pages solely on football, with jargons completely alien to a non professional, and a modus parlando, a speaking style, that was hard to follow, interspersed with foreign words that were not explained It was a hard read from the beginning, until, towards the middle somewhere, when some human drama was introduced into the story It was then I started paying attention, and thethis drama developed into the many turns and twists it went through, theI was hooked.Ada showed a great restraint She was very disciplined, and in the end, she showed courage It took a lot of courage for her to take that final step When love is as strong as these two felt, the inevitable always happens I enjoyed this book It was like a study into areas of non expertise for me All those names of foot ballers, what they did, and how they did it, did not resonate with me It was a hard read as I already said, and it took a lot of grinta, tenaciousness, on my part to tackle this book


  3. Maggie Maggie says:

    I enjoyed it overall, but it was a bit of a hard read for me at first I appreciate the use of dialect and the development each character is given, and the story s professional and emotional conflict is respectably multi faceted, but it took me a little bit to really get invested in the characters I had to really push myself until about 1 3 of the way in, but once the plot started to progresssteadily, I certainly found myself curious to know how things would unfold A good read for a rain I enjoyed it overall, but it was a bit of a hard read for me at first I appreciate the use of dialect and the development each character is given, and the story s professional and emotional conflict is respectably multi faceted, but it took me a little bit to really get invested in the characters I had to really push myself until about 1 3 of the way in, but once the plot started to progresssteadily, I certainly found myself curious to know how things would unfold A good read for a rainy day, but be certain you re willing to invest


  4. Jacqueline Creek Jacqueline Creek says:

    I love a story when the author has done his research and Steven Kay has certainly done this It is interesting and well written Local historians and any football enthusiast whoever they follow will be blown away with the content, especially as Sheffield Football Club is the oldest in England, although this does not exactly relate to Sheffield United Well Done Steve, excellent writing.


  5. Robin Chambers Robin Chambers says:

    I deeply enjoyed this book It felt as though Steven Kay rather like Shirley Harris Slaughter in Our Lady of Victory, was taking a personal piece of family history involving a section of society widely discriminated against and celebrating the heroism and the pity of its struggle What a piece of work is a man said Hamlet The digital revolution is making itpossible than ever before for books to be published about the trials and achievements of ordinary individuals, in many cases born I deeply enjoyed this book It felt as though Steven Kay rather like Shirley Harris Slaughter in Our Lady of Victory, was taking a personal piece of family history involving a section of society widely discriminated against and celebrating the heroism and the pity of its struggle What a piece of work is a man said Hamlet The digital revolution is making itpossible than ever before for books to be published about the trials and achievements of ordinary individuals, in many cases born with social and cultural mountains to climb or be flattened by.Rabbi Howell was born into a Romany family two years before the 1870 Education Act in Britain made elementary schooling universally available to children from 5 13 The nomadic culture remembered nostalgically by himself and his family must have been a factor in Rab s never having learned to read or write in one of the new Gorgio i.e non Romany schools but he had the raw talent and drive to escape from mining which he hated and become one of the best half backs in English football, playing professionally two guineas a week for Sheffield United and briefly for England This is the story of one momentous year in his life, from 17 April 1897 Good Friday 8th April 1898.It is so muchthan a piece of footballing fan faction It s a penetratingly well observed depiction of Late Victorian times in Yorkshire and the North East of England the grinding poverty, the labour struggles, the importance of football as a means for the working man to escape the dreariness and drudgery of his everyday existence football fighting sorrow for the souls of men It s about Rab s personal struggle to have his first wife and her parents value what he did as opposed to a proper job how telling and sad that in his thirtieth year, on their fourth child s birth certificate, his first wife Selina listed his occupation as miner , and about the reasons why they grew apart, neither able to conform to what the other wanted them to be.Here s a flavour of the writing from page 1 Angry peak skies were trying to drown little Glossop huddled and cowering in the valley bottom beneath the sullen moors that had encircled her In Dickensian fashion, Steven Kay uses the unremitting bleakness of the weather and the terrible industrial pollution of the cities, towns and rivers to set the mood of ordinary people hemmed in by their struggle to make ends meet and find some kind of personal and spiritual fulfilment beyond putting all their eggs in the basket of the afterlife Steam and smoke rose up from the brewery and mingled over St Mary s Church I think this is a great book beautifully written and deeply empathetic in its depiction of the several characters and their individual struggles Reading it, I experienced the same catharsis as when reading any of the notable tragedies written by the literary giants I learned about en route to a degree in English I thank Steven Kay for his industry and skill in taking me on this particular journey, ending fittingly enough in an unmarked grave in Preston in 1937 Consider Rabbi Howell s journey through life now to have been fittingly commemorated


  6. Steven Kay Steven Kay says:

    I can t review my own book obviously so you could take a look at or This is what the Historical Novel Society review says Rabbi Howell is twenty eight Born in a tent on the edge of Sheffield to Romani parents, he escaped the mines and became a professional footballer for the new formed team I can t review my own book obviously so you could take a look at or This is what the Historical Novel Society review says Rabbi Howell is twenty eight Born in a tent on the edge of Sheffield to Romani parents, he escaped the mines and became a professional footballer for the new formed team of Sheffield United, but a heavy tackle leaves him on the bench for the rest of the season Is this the beginning of the end His in laws regularly tell their daughter, Selina, that her husband needs a proper job She is just glad that with young mouths to feed he is earning money, but sometimes it seems he is living a dream without her.Rab is on light training until his leg mends, but he is being paid, and he has the support and encouragement of his brother, Charlie Then he encounters a lame horse, and a red headed girl and everything changes.This is a fictional account of a real man s life, and much of the story is drawn from fact The football history is fascinating and will engage even readers without an interest in the game The life and work of a professional footballer in the 1890s was very different from the modern image an employee of the club, players were expected to toe the line There was no glory or adulation and Rab was looked down upon because he did not work in the pit The social background is well crafted, drawing on real events such as the Queen s visit to Sheffield This was a world where everyone knew their place and duty the common man respected his betters and did as he was told A player who argued risked his livelihood a married man who spoke to an unmarried woman was risking everything.The story is about a footballer, but it is not a football story Rabbi Howell is a Romani, but this is not a gypsy romance It is an engaging, compelling, read, with finely drawn characters and a fascinating background Highly recommended


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The Evergreen in red and white ❮PDF❯ ⚦ The Evergreen in red and white ✐ Author Steven Kay – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk It is the year of Queen Victoria s Diamond Jubilee Rabbi Howell of Sheffield United, the first Romany to play for England, knows his career is peaking and the only way is down His fate seems to be a r It is the year in red PDF/EPUB ✓ of Queen Victoria s Diamond Jubilee Rabbi Howell of Sheffield United, the first Romany to play for England, knows his career is peaking and the only way is down His fate seems to be a return to obscurity, literally and metaphorically, back down the pit, his life ruled by the winding wheel and the domestic pattern set by his wife, Selina, her parents and family He then meets Ada and risks throwing away career, home everything Follow Rab, Selina, Ada and The United through The Evergreen PDF/EPUB ² this turbulent, historic year.