Nutrition: A Very Short Introduction ePUB Õ A Very

Nutrition: A Very Short Introduction ePUB Õ A Very



10 thoughts on “Nutrition: A Very Short Introduction

  1. Bernie Gourley Bernie Gourley says:

    Do you want to know what percentage of your diet should be carbohydrates because your personal trainer is telling you it s zero Do you know whether you need vitamin B12 supplements How much energy does your huge human brain use What the hell is Kwashiorkor If these types of questions are of interest to you, you might be interested in this book There s nothing particularly fancy or exciting about this book, but it s still a useful book for a couple of reasons First, it sticks to the science Do you want to know what percentage of your diet should be carbohydrates because your personal trainer is telling you it s zero Do you know whether you need vitamin B12 supplements How much energy does your huge human brain use What the hell is Kwashiorkor If these types of questions are of interest to you, you might be interested in this book There s nothing particularly fancy or exciting about this book, but it s still a useful book for a couple of reasons First, it sticks to the science on the subject, and diet and nutrition is one of the most myth and disinformation riddled subjects around because there are so many people trying to shill their fad diets and because there are so many who desperately want to believe that they can cut pounds and still eat a case of Twinkies every week through some scientific loophole psst, you can t Here and there throughout this book, there are quick deconstructions of these myths and lies i.e I should point out that some of this dietary wisdom will result in weight loss but it won t necessarily result in a net health gain e.g If you cut out carbs, you ll lose weight but your brain will also be starved of the glucose that it needs to conduct its business and will have to engage in slow and costly processes to get it from elsewhere Second, the book is short and to the point If you don t have a lot of time to devote to reading up on nutrition, this may be the book for you The book consists of eight chapters Chapter 1 Why eat deals with appetite and satiety, and not just the less than profound question of why a human body needs energy Chapter 2 Energy Nutrition gives the basics of food as an energy source as opposed to food as building blocks Chapter 3 Protein Nutrition teaches one about food as building blocks Chapter 4 Over nutrition and Problems of Overweight and Obesity addresses the causes of being overweight as well as explaining how to counteract those causes One nice feature of this chapter is it gives a quick and dirty summation of the various types of diets, tells which are supported by science, and explains which have undesirable unintended consequences Chapter 5 Diet and Health explains many of the ways nutrition influences health Contrary to popular belief, weight isn t the only way or, necessarily, the most critical way in which dietary problems can adversely affect health In other words, it s possible to be stocky or curvy and in good overall health, or, alternatively, one can be svelte and running up on death s door This chapter also describes first world ailments that are sometimes called diseases of affluence Chapter 6 Under nutrition Marasmus, cachexia, and kwashiorkor Don t know what those words mean Think they are towns in a sword and sorcery fantasy novel You ll know after finishing this chapter Chapter 7 Vitamins and Minerals Most of the dietary suggestions in the book up to this point are put in terms of macro nutrients i.e carbohydrates, fats, and proteins , but this chapter focuses on micro nutrients There s a reason micro nutrients are addressed so late in the book, and that s that most people who are getting sufficient macro nutrients from actual food as opposed to the stuff sold at McDonald s or in convenience stores get all they need of micro nutrients But there can be issues with micro nutrients such as iron, calcium, vitamin D, and Vitamin B12 depending upon one s unique life situation In other words, unless your doctor tells you that you need a supplement, you probably don t Chapter 8 Functional Foods, Super Foods, and Supplements Probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, super foods, and supplements One area that gets short shrift in this book is the importance of one s gut bacteria which has become a huge part of the discussion of late There is a little mention of it in this chapter, but not much There are few graphics in the book, but there are many tables I didn t feel anything was missing in terms of graphics None of these Very Short Introduction guides offers much by way of bibliography, and the Further Reading section tends to favor textbooks over popular works This book is no exception in either regard.I d recommend this book for anybody who wants a quick low down on the science of nutrition As mentioned, the one area I thought it might have delved into in greater depth was the role of gut microbes However, overall, I think it was well organized and provided interesting food for thought pun recognized, but not intended


  2. Leon Altherr Leon Altherr says:

    A healthy adult eats about a tonne of food a year If a metal or ion has a function in the body, it must be provided by the diet, since it is not possible to convert one chemical element into another The vitamins are organic compounds with a variety of functions They cannot be synthesized in the body, and so must be provided by the diet 0 Why we eat A healthy adult eats around a tonne of food a year Appetite influenced by a physiological factors hunger and satiety, protection f A healthy adult eats about a tonne of food a year If a metal or ion has a function in the body, it must be provided by the diet, since it is not possible to convert one chemical element into another The vitamins are organic compounds with a variety of functions They cannot be synthesized in the body, and so must be provided by the diet 0 Why we eat A healthy adult eats around a tonne of food a year Appetite influenced by a physiological factors hunger and satiety, protection from allergies , b psychological pleasure of eating flavour and texture, memories associated with foods positive memories make fooddesirable while negative memories make them less desirable and habits and c social factors availability, convenience, eating alone or in company, ethical taboos, medical reasons etc 1 Water The human body contains about 60 per cent water Daily intake around 3l litres for men, 2.1l for women Intake 66% drinking, 22% water in food, 13% metabolic water water produced when macros are oxidised to yield energy Output 48% urine, 21% sweat, 13% exhaled air, 15% insensible losses, 3% faeces Just 500ml urine output per day required to prevent dehydration and for waste secretion Water may not be the best liquid to replenish water lost while sweating because it lacks mineral salts.2.1 Neuroscience of Appetite Brain Areas Arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus responsible for appetite inhibition damage to hunger centre leads to complete loss of appetite electrical stimulation toappetite and exhibition damage to satiety centre leads to uncontrolled eating electrical stimulation to cessation of eating, even in a fasted state Also linked to the cortex higher brain centres individual preferences can override physiological control of appetite Amygdala controls learned food behaviour knowing that something is a food, kids put lots of things in their mouth till they learn Nucleus acumbens concerned with the pleasure rewards of eating.2.2 Neuroscience of Appetite Hormones Pancreas Insulin when blood glucose rises and glucagon when blood glucose falls Gastro intestinal tract Ghrelin to stimulate feeding and others as satiety signals Adipose tissue Leptin low levels in women lead to cessation of menstruation and appetite increase, high levels lead to increased appetite and metabolic rate.3.1 Distinguishing between foods Taste Taste buds can distinguish between five basic tastes for different purposes a For the detection of nutrients and thus pleasant taste Saltiness Pleasurable response so that that the physiological sodium needs are met.Savouriness umami Due to free amino acids to detect protein rich foods.Sweetness To detect carbohydrates energy sources enzyme amylase is secreted in saliva to break starch down to sugars while chewing.Fattiness Lipase secreted to break fat down to free fatty acids which permits the detection of fat rich foods energy source b For the detection of toxins sourness and bitterness , unpleasant taste as many toxins that occur in food are bitter or sour can be overcome through learning.3.2 Distinguishing between foods Smell Some flavours and aromas are pleasurable fruity, coffee, roasting meat to tempt people to eat and stimulate appetite Some are repulsive decaying meat, mouldy bread to warn of possible dangers and inhibit appetite Appetite for food with unpleasant aroma can also be acquired and there svariety between people e.g some hate the smell of Brussels sprouts or cooked cabbage while others enjoy it.4 Eating disorders Anorexia nervosa Severe calorie restriction coupled with low bodyweight and a distorted self image of one s body 2% of adolescent girls go through a phase Bulimia nervosa Food restriction followed by binge eating attacks and subsequent attempts to lose the food they ve just consumed e.g through inducing vomiting and taking laxatives and diuretics bodyweight usually remains in the normal range and can sometimes be treated by antidepressant medication.5 Religion and Ethics In Islam and Judaism only meat from animals with cloven hooves that chew the cud are halal and kosher clean Meat of other animals such as scavenging, birds of prey and detritus feeding fish is haram and traife unclean these arelikely to carry parasites thus, these ancient prohibitions may be based on food hygiene Hindus do not eat beef as the cow is a valuable source of milk and dung and useful as a beast of burden Pescatarian no meat, but fish , Lacto Ovo milk and eggs and vegan no animal products Organic without the use of synthetic pesticides, inorganic fertilisers and not genetically modified.6 Influences on nutrient content and flavour Soil, fertilisers used, amount of sunlight and water


  3. Helbob Helbob says:

    Interesting, informative, concise Does exactly what it says on the tin.


  4. Triin Triin says:

    Great short reading for travelling Mostly about how body uses uses different nutrients as fuel of energy.


  5. Dimitris Dimitris says:

    Short as the promised yet is packed with engough information to get you started with the subject I highly recommend it.


  6. Kevin Winata Kevin Winata says:

    Useful and provided some basics But could be a lot better if focus less on some details andabout fundamental concepts problems regarding nutrition.


  7. Apollos Michio Apollos Michio says:

    A scientific read that is unavoidably dry but filled with important yet concise information on the topic of nutrition.


  8. Ian Ian says:

    From the book Biotin acts in a small number of metabolic reactions, and also has a role in controlling cell division and proliferation The vitamin is widespread in foods, and deficiency has only been reported in a small number of people who consumed abnormally large amounts of uncooked egg white typically a dozen orraw eggs a day for several years The protein avidin in egg whites binds biotin so that it is not available for absorption However, when the egg is cooked, avidin is denatur From the book Biotin acts in a small number of metabolic reactions, and also has a role in controlling cell division and proliferation The vitamin is widespread in foods, and deficiency has only been reported in a small number of people who consumed abnormally large amounts of uncooked egg white typically a dozen orraw eggs a day for several years The protein avidin in egg whites binds biotin so that it is not available for absorption However, when the egg is cooked, avidin is denatured and can no longer bind biotin Imagine eating that many raw eggs


  9. Adam Adam says:

    Recommended reading It s less than 100 pages and contains lots of interesting tidbits We all know you relikely to get type II diabetes if you re obese, but 20 80 times I didn t realise it was so stark Oneinteresting thing is that the NHS spends twice as much money on malnutrition than they do on overweight people Wasn t expecting that one.It also provokes some food for thought As we reach satiety with one food, so another, different, flavour is offered to stimulate our appet Recommended reading It s less than 100 pages and contains lots of interesting tidbits We all know you relikely to get type II diabetes if you re obese, but 20 80 times I didn t realise it was so stark Oneinteresting thing is that the NHS spends twice as much money on malnutrition than they do on overweight people Wasn t expecting that one.It also provokes some food for thought As we reach satiety with one food, so another, different, flavour is offered to stimulate our appetite A number of studies have shown that, faced with only one food, people tend to reach satiety sooner than when a variety of foods is on offer This is the difference between hunger and appetite even when we are satiated, we can still find room to try something different So if you wanted to lose weight, whilst allowing for diversity on the scale of your overall diet, perhaps you would profit from keeping it rather lacking in variety on the scale of individual meals You d then make up for any lack of nutrition in that meal with a completely different subsequent meal, which would again be narrow, but complement the previous one MaybeWhat about vitamin supplements Go ahead with vitamin D if you don t get much sunlight Get some C if you don t consume much fruit and veg Fish oil too Everything else don t bother apparently.Two main criticisms 1 Sometimes reads like a conversational Wikipedia page Could do with a fewstories.2 Sometimes too remedial Obviously, this series is supposed to be, to some extent, but who would need to be told the following Some people are naturally adventurous, and will try a new food just because they have never eaten it before Others areconservative, and will try a new food only when they see someone else eating it safely and with enjoyment Others are yetconservative in their food choices the most conservative eaters know that they do not like a new food 3 stars for readability and 4 for content Given the price for a 100 page book, we ll call it 3


  10. Tso William Tso William says:

    Nutrition is a topic that many people talk about but few studies Nutritionists unintentionally spread misinformation when they are only given a few minutes in TV The general attention deficit of people means that most of the knowledge comes from columns of newspapers or worse from half digested or downright misleading information in websites This very short introduction provides a good summary of the key concepts in the first few chapters but later breaks down into a list of impenetrable jarg Nutrition is a topic that many people talk about but few studies Nutritionists unintentionally spread misinformation when they are only given a few minutes in TV The general attention deficit of people means that most of the knowledge comes from columns of newspapers or worse from half digested or downright misleading information in websites This very short introduction provides a good summary of the key concepts in the first few chapters but later breaks down into a list of impenetrable jargons, especially in the chapter on minerals and vitamins But for these defects, this book is necessary to get the basics right in this age of mis information


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Nutrition: A Very Short Introduction [Ebook] ➩ Nutrition: A Very Short Introduction By David Bender – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk In this Very Short Introduction, David Bender explains the basic elements of food, the balance between energy intake and exercise, the problems of over and under nutrition, and raises questions on the In this Very Short Introduction, David Very Short MOBI î Bender explains the basic elements of food, the balance between energy intake and exercise, the problems of over and under nutrition, and raises questions on the safety of nutritional supplements Looking broadly at what constitutes nutrition, Bender provides insight into a topic of wide interest and importance in today s world With a look at diet in relation to nutrition, this Very Short Introduction provides an overview of Nutrition: A Kindle - the biochemistry of nutrition and the health risks associated with poor nutrition including obesity and types of food allergies It provides an essential guide to effectively understand the principles of, and necessary reasons for, a healthy diet.