PoMoSexuals: Challenging Assumptions About Gender and

PoMoSexuals: Challenging Assumptions About Gender and

PoMoSexuals: Challenging Assumptions About Gender and Sexuality [Read] ➭ PoMoSexuals: Challenging Assumptions About Gender and Sexuality Author Carol Queen – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk PoMo short for PostModern in the arts, a movement following after and in direct reaction to Modernism culturally, an outlook that acknowledges diverse and complex points of viewPoMoSexual the queer er PoMo short for PostModern in the arts, Assumptions About ePUB ☆ a movement following after and in direct reaction to Modernism culturally, an outlook that acknowledges diverse and complex points of viewPoMoSexual the queer erotic reality beyond the boundaries of gender, separatism, and essentialist notions of sexual orientation.


10 thoughts on “PoMoSexuals: Challenging Assumptions About Gender and Sexuality

  1. Lord Beardsley Lord Beardsley says:

    This is probably the best book about gender and sexuality I ve ever read It discusses the many different facets of human sexuality that aren t necessarily mapped out by what you have between your legs or on your chest In a world of cookie cutter voidoids who identify themselves purely by their sexuality gym bunny fags and Michigan barf Womyn s Music Festival Nazis not to mention the vast, dismal sea of heterosexism found in every other straight relationship out there, it s nice to read abo This is probably the best book about gender and sexuality I ve ever read It discusses the many different facets of human sexuality that aren t necessarily mapped out by what you have between your legs or on your chest In a world of cookie cutter voidoids who identify themselves purely by their sexuality gym bunny fags and Michigan barf Womyn s Music Festival Nazis not to mention the vast, dismal sea of heterosexism found in every other straight relationship out there, it s nice to read about people not afraid to realise that everything is a construct and they can be whatever the hell they feel like beingand sexualityit s greatbut it s not your definition of self This book has temporarily saved my life, acting as a reminder in a predominantly hetero conventional relationship sexuality town that those outside the norm of stereotypical gay or nauseatingly straight actually do exist


  2. AB AB says:

    PoMosexuals was recommended to me by a friend who knows me, and knows I don t quite fit into any of the specific, prescribed queer identity labels.She also knows I m addicted to essay collections on queerness, sexuality and feminist topics I love my friends.Many of the essays weren t of interest to me, but some struck a chord I felt, however, that the book didn t make much of an impact on me, at least not as I was expecting As I was reading the essays I realised PoMosexuals was published 12 y PoMosexuals was recommended to me by a friend who knows me, and knows I don t quite fit into any of the specific, prescribed queer identity labels.She also knows I m addicted to essay collections on queerness, sexuality and feminist topics I love my friends.Many of the essays weren t of interest to me, but some struck a chord I felt, however, that the book didn t make much of an impact on me, at least not as I was expecting As I was reading the essays I realised PoMosexuals was published 12 years ago, and this shows.It s not that the conversation on gender and definitions has moved on, mind Much of the LGBT gaystream could really profit from reading it Forgive the condescension, but among my lesbian friends, many still have doubts about the existence of truly bi people, let alone pansexual.But the main problem with queerness or pomosexuality is that we give words weight, while at the same time forgetting they are cognitive tools Words give us power and take it away, that s the primordial postmodern principle But it comes full circle when we realise that if we opt out of that paradigm, we don t access the power that words and definitions give us Queerness has the same problem, especially in its breadth Anyway.I personally found the involving despite not being eye opening Riki Wilchins essay on having sex in a trans body was the closest to home, but so was the one about a small poly family unit under Soviet Russia.I do recommend the book Most essays will be of interest for those wanting to step away from rigidly defined queer identities and feeling like there sout there to explore


  3. Arin Williams Arin Williams says:

    I looked to this book to find people like myself bisexual, genderqueer, polyamorous, loving a cisgender person and a transgender person , but mostly what I found was gay men and lesbians with little quirks, bisexuals who refused to be called bisexuals and some that outright owned it, thank goodness , and people who were most likely transgender but couldn t yet bear to call themselves such I was frustrated by most essays, especially the absolutely baffling Beyond Bisexuality, in which sexual I looked to this book to find people like myself bisexual, genderqueer, polyamorous, loving a cisgender person and a transgender person , but mostly what I found was gay men and lesbians with little quirks, bisexuals who refused to be called bisexuals and some that outright owned it, thank goodness , and people who were most likely transgender but couldn t yet bear to call themselves such I was frustrated by most essays, especially the absolutely baffling Beyond Bisexuality, in which sexuality comes down to a matter of math I enjoyed Pat Califia s Identity Sedition and Pornography I have so much respect for him as a writer and a person, and his essay simply augmented that respect Naturally, I had some trouble stomaching the outdated language of this book, including numerous uses of the grammatical failure transgendered and the uncomfortable fag, and even one usage of the outright offensive shim Reading books like this shows me how far we ve come as a community, and how much we still have left to learn


  4. Annabeth Leong Annabeth Leong says:

    Wow I almost never reread books, and I can t think of a time I wanted to begin a book again the moment I read the last page, but this book affected me that way It s deep and refreshing, full of essays that are both personal and thought provoking I got a ton out of reading it, and I know I could getby reading it again This will be of particular interest to anyone who feels they don t fit neatly within a certain gender or sexuality label, but I think it would be great if it were read muc Wow I almost never reread books, and I can t think of a time I wanted to begin a book again the moment I read the last page, but this book affected me that way It s deep and refreshing, full of essays that are both personal and thought provoking I got a ton out of reading it, and I know I could getby reading it again This will be of particular interest to anyone who feels they don t fit neatly within a certain gender or sexuality label, but I think it would be great if it were read muchwidely than that It introduces important nuance to subjects that are all too often treated as black and white PoMoSexuals was published in the late 90s, and there are ways that it is obviously dated Current social trends have moved from where they were at the time the authors were writing Honestly, however, the book comes off as all thesignificant and prescient considering that I found these voices from the past valuable in that they predicted ways society was moving and commented insightfully on those issues It also gave me insight into feelings I had during the late 90s, since it reminded me of ideas that were floating around at the time The book did make me a little sad Some things it discusses, such as the stereotypes faced by bisexuals, do not seem to me to have improved much since the time the book was published PoMoSexuals does not pretend to comprehensive discussion of gray areas, and some sections are covered better than others However, I would say it s a vital exploration of territory that s ignored far too often


  5. Vi Vi says:

    This book was likely a golden book for its time in the 1990s However as a 2017 reader, you can definitely tell it s dated such as through the use of some terminology found in the book The book is essentially a book that begins to dive into understanding the concept of pomosexuality which is coined by this book , but majority of it is made up of different snippets of life stories from different people exploring their own sexuality, that wouldn t fit typically LGBT labels bisexual, ga This book was likely a golden book for its time in the 1990s However as a 2017 reader, you can definitely tell it s dated such as through the use of some terminology found in the book The book is essentially a book that begins to dive into understanding the concept of pomosexuality which is coined by this book , but majority of it is made up of different snippets of life stories from different people exploring their own sexuality, that wouldn t fit typically LGBT labels bisexual, gay lesbian, etc Asexuality was NOT well known at the time of this book, so I m not surprised it isn t really mentioned in said book.I would advise readers to NOT jump into this book, expecting just a book about exploring philosophies and sociology behind LGBT That is NOT what this book is though the title and book description might give that impression As someone who enjoys reading about different kinds of queer LGBT theory , this book does give a good taste of exploring What is the gray area of LGBT , but I feel like this book leavesto be desired.This book would be ideal for people just beginning to explore their sexuality, as well as for those who want to be challenged about what exactly is lesbianism gayness and bisexuality I feel that the contemporary Pomosexual community as in the 2017 individuals who identify as Pomo, since that s the year of this review would greatly benefit from writing an updated version per say of the idea and concept of pomosexuality.On a side note, there are sections of this book that get explicitly sexual with some depictions of the individual peoples sex lives If you are sensitive to those descriptions, you can honestly skim those sections of the book and still get a good idea of how the different people are exploring their sexuality


  6. Leilani Leilani says:

    kate bornstein was correct in saying this book would change how i view things, as cliche as that may sound i have always rejected the terms gay lesbian bisexual because the notion of there only being two genders XX, XY, XO, XXY, XXO, etc being various common chromosomal orders though the anomalies are dubbed as syndromes seems alien to me however, along with my queer self identity, i have a tendency to carry, i like female bodied people because of their female bodies and i like male bo kate bornstein was correct in saying this book would change how i view things, as cliche as that may sound i have always rejected the terms gay lesbian bisexual because the notion of there only being two genders XX, XY, XO, XXY, XXO, etc being various common chromosomal orders though the anomalies are dubbed as syndromes seems alien to me however, along with my queer self identity, i have a tendency to carry, i like female bodied people because of their female bodies and i like male bodied people because of the male bodies and i would like others but i haven t had the oppurtunity yet but inherently, i meant that there was a female female way of loving in my relationships with female bodied people while there was a female male way of loving in my relationships with male bodied people and i never realized how constricting that was i have reprimanded myself in the past when i would fantasize about old female bodied lovers penetrating me, saying that was putting a heteronormative paradigm on a supposedly liberating relationship however, though i should have known this, sexuality is farsubtle than the labels and identities we give ourselves and to others the idea of changing my genitalia was not anything new to me but something i am thinking aboutandafter reading the accounts of other transsexuals


  7. za za says:

    half way through.i have some hesitations about this book because it claims to take on the hefty task of breaking down boundaries within among queer identities and queer sex certain essays are really amazing and well written while others have a dry style or present breakdowns that are a little last week the dorothy allison essay is incredible read it if only for allison s essay.


  8. Edie Kestenbaum Edie Kestenbaum says:

    I need to readbooks like this Reading this book was like falling into someone s arms, or taking a warm bath Reminded me that it s okay to be messy and outside of the boxes Reading books like this helps me break down the labels until they dissolve into people.


  9. Sarah Cavar Sarah Cavar says:

    Surprisingly excellent given its age a year older than I am and contains several lyrical, unique essays in relationships between gender and sexuality that aren t usually explored, particularly gendered embodiment and specific sexual desires.


  10. Zane Carey Zane Carey says:

    Very graphic, muchthan what I usually read, but very good I loved the exploration into confusion, bisexuality, and fluidity A short read, but very mentally taxing.


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