Killer on the Road Kindle ☆ Killer on ePUB ↠

Killer on the Road Kindle ☆ Killer on ePUB ↠


    Killer on the Road Kindle ☆ Killer on ePUB ↠ call him many things but Martin Plunkett s real name is Death His brilliant, twisted mind is a horriying place to explore His madness reflects a nation s own The killer is on the road And there s nowhere in America to hide."/>
  • Paperback
  • 272 pages
  • Killer on the Road
  • James Ellroy
  • English
  • 03 September 2019
  • 038080896X

10 thoughts on “Killer on the Road

  1. Hugh McBride Hugh McBride says:

    Surprised to be giving an Ellroy novel anything less than four stars, but this one just didn t do it for me An early work that is written primarily as a first person recounting of a serial killer s cross country reign of terror, Killer on the Road shows flashes of Ellroy s later greatness, but suffers from a plot that substitutes gore for suspense The events portrayed in this novel are harrowing and the narrator s lack of remorse is chilling but the novel fails to bridge the disconnect Surprised to be giving an Ellroy novel anything less than four stars, but this one just didn t do it for me An early work that is written primarily as a first person recounting of a serial killer s cross country reign of terror, Killer on the Road shows flashes of Ellroy s later greatness, but suffers from a plot that substitutes gore for suspense The events portrayed in this novel are harrowing and the narrator s lack of remorse is chilling but the novel fails to bridge the disconnect that exists between the narrator s thoughts deeds In the end, the reader is left feeling similarly disconnected not in an inside the killer s head way, but in an I just don t much care about the people in this novel way


  2. RB RB says:

    Killer on the Road is possibly James Ellroy s best book, one that s sadly overlooked, forgotten, written off as just an early work , and not a novel to attach as much admiration to as his larger, multi narrative novels A fuller version of a review of sorts will appear soon.


  3. Matthew Wilder Matthew Wilder says:

    Here is where Ellroy s literary pretensions I mean, ambitions begin The book is still short and unsweet, like Ellroy s earlier novels but the effort to create a leviathan pulp narrative that will sum up his American moment begins here.In truth, KILLER isabstract and existential than it is period specific Ellroy twists Dostoevskyan dread into underground, kudzu curling homoerotic knots There is a ghastly old school Freudianism at work here, gnarled into shapes that, at novel s end, you Here is where Ellroy s literary pretensions I mean, ambitions begin The book is still short and unsweet, like Ellroy s earlier novels but the effort to create a leviathan pulp narrative that will sum up his American moment begins here.In truth, KILLER isabstract and existential than it is period specific Ellroy twists Dostoevskyan dread into underground, kudzu curling homoerotic knots There is a ghastly old school Freudianism at work here, gnarled into shapes that, at novel s end, you won t want to think about KILLER has a number of similarities to Bret Ellis AMERICAN PSYCHO, though not its second by second physical terror Ellroy isinterested in ideas than sensations or experiences Is it as strong as Ellroy s quartet of massive postwar potboilers No but as first person psycho narratives go, it sure is a dilly


  4. Chris Chris says:

    My brother gave this book to me for Christmas, and to be honest, I was a little bit hesitant to start reading it Not because I thought it would be bad On the contrary, all of my siblings are creative, intelligent and insightful people, and I would trust any of their reading recommendations without a moment s hesitation I just can t always promise that I ll like what they recommend The book my brother gave me before that was Narcissus and Goldemund by Hermann Hesse It wasn t a bad book, real My brother gave this book to me for Christmas, and to be honest, I was a little bit hesitant to start reading it Not because I thought it would be bad On the contrary, all of my siblings are creative, intelligent and insightful people, and I would trust any of their reading recommendations without a moment s hesitation I just can t always promise that I ll like what they recommend The book my brother gave me before that was Narcissus and Goldemund by Hermann Hesse It wasn t a bad book, really it s just that I hated the main character Goldemund with a white hot passion and wished grave misfortune on him for the entire book In fact, the main thing that kept me reading the book was the hope that he d eventually fall down a dry well and break his legs, or perhaps get hit in the head by a two by four and live the rest of his life as a drooling moron That the book aroused such great passion in me is a testament to the author s skills, although I don t think that was quite his goal Let s just say that there were a few unpleasantly familiar themes that made it hard for me to be and objective judge of his actions Anyway, I figure my brother couldn t have known that, so I don t blame him This book, however,than makes up Killer on the Road is a book about a serial killer Now I know what you re thinking the serial killer angle has been done to death HAR There are serial killers in all kinds of airport novels, comic books, movies, and TV shows It would seem like there s really no new way that you can do a serial killer, other than to have him useandhorrifying means to kill people, and that s all just flash But trust me, even if you re feeling a bit worn out on serial killer fiction, I think you ll want to read this one The standard portrayal of a serial killer in most modern literature is that of a cipher we don t know why he does what he does, and we don t really care The recent TV drama Dexter is an interesting exception, of course, although if I were a gambling man, I would suppose that show owes something of its origin to this book.The traditional serial killer is a monster to be hunted down and destroyed Even when serial killer characters are handled well, they re still just foils against which we can play the police characters Where the killer is a hyper intellectual, the cop s street knowledge and common sense will prevail The twisted perversity of the murderer helps play up the straight morality of the cop and society as a whole, by extension Ultimately, of course, we just enjoy the chase in the sure and certain knowledge that we ll see the Bad Guy in jail by the end of it In this book, the Bad Guy is in jail from the first page Already, the author has taken away that carrot, and so we have to readjust our expectations a bit Martin Plunkett is a serial killer Over the course of a decade, he murders nearly 70 people across America until he is finally caught in New York This book is his story, and his explanation of why he did what he did Ellroy obviously did a whole lot of research for this book, probably both from the law enforcement side of serial killing and the psychological side There would be no way to write the character of Plunkett as thoroughly, convincingly and to a point sympathetically as he did Make no mistake, Martin Plunkett is a monster He kills without hesitation or remorse, and he does it to satisfy urges that normal people shouldn t have But at the same time, he is a human being For all that his moral scale has been skewed waaaaaay off to the bad side, he still has worries, hopes and dreams We get to see him grow up from childhood He meets the circumstances and makes the choices that all eventually lead him to his vocation as serial killer He didn t just wake up one day and start killing, anythan I woke up one morning and started teaching English There is a chain there, a somewhat logical series of events that he follows willingly Once he gets going, the murders become defining moments of his life, rather than simply the horrible acts of a madman The story isn t about the dead It s about the killer In the end, what made Plunkett what he was That is, after all, what the book is ostensibly trying to figure out, and it s the question we always ask when we see something on the news that horrifies us We want there to be a reason for such terrible things, because if there s a reason for a problem, then the problem can be fixed If we know that violence arises from factors X, Y, and Z, then all we have to do is correct for those things and it ll be done Right The answer is we don t know Was he a frustrated misanthrope, trying to get revenge on the world Kind of Was he an abused child who had no other way of expressing his childhood traumas Sort of Was he an avatar of true Evil, spawned by our corrupt and decaying culture Maybe It doesn t matter to Plunkett, and therefore it doesn t matter to us He is what he is, and there s no getting around that.Ellroy could be warning us against trying to find such simple explanations for terrifying things That in our search for order, there will always be the anomalies that simply cannot be fixed There will always be people like Plunkett out there, and there s not a whole lot we can do about it In that way, he s defying the expectations of serial killer fiction the killer will never truly be understood and will never truly be caught He s always out there somewhere, even if the Plunketts of the world are in jail There will always be a killer on the road somewhere


  5. Adam Adam says:

    I m used to James Ellroy novels being fairly dark and depraved, but Killer on the Road hit a new level Following the exploits of a young serial killer from his formative years through his capture which isn t a spoiler, it s the first chapter , this was hard to read at many moments While I would say the novel is somewhat lacking in narrative momentum, it still completely held my attention throughout And certain moments were truly fascinating, albeit in a very macabre way I haven t read all o I m used to James Ellroy novels being fairly dark and depraved, but Killer on the Road hit a new level Following the exploits of a young serial killer from his formative years through his capture which isn t a spoiler, it s the first chapter , this was hard to read at many moments While I would say the novel is somewhat lacking in narrative momentum, it still completely held my attention throughout And certain moments were truly fascinating, albeit in a very macabre way I haven t read all of Ellroy s works yet, but I still get a feeling that this one will stand out as something very unique once I have finished them all


  6. Ed [Redacted] Ed [Redacted] says:

    This is my second time through this book and I think I agree with my earlier four star rating, though in retrospect it may have dropped a half of a star or so I m sure Mr Ellroy will lose a lot of sleep over this This is the best of Ellroy s early books that I have read Though serial killer fiction is well past overdone now, it was pretty cutting edge when Killer on the Road was written It is a chilling book that captures your attention and fixes it on something, and someone, very ugly.Thi This is my second time through this book and I think I agree with my earlier four star rating, though in retrospect it may have dropped a half of a star or so I m sure Mr Ellroy will lose a lot of sleep over this This is the best of Ellroy s early books that I have read Though serial killer fiction is well past overdone now, it was pretty cutting edge when Killer on the Road was written It is a chilling book that captures your attention and fixes it on something, and someone, very ugly.This is a fairly graphic book, though nothing like the brutal violence of The Big Nowhere in the eyesockets Is that even possible For those who demand books that don t involve dog murder, there is a fairly graphic example early on in this one You were warned Melki


  7. James James says:

    Transitional piece by Ellroy as he moves from the early promise of Clandestine through the Lloyd Hopkins trilogy to the beginning of the great L.A Quartet The Black Dahlia Also known as Silent Terror , this portrait of a serial killer is curiously flat and detached, with excessive violence but no real suspense or, and this is worse, style I read it to be an Ellroy completist, and have no real wish to revisit it.


  8. Matt Matt says:

    Wickedly evil, yet strangely compelling Ellroy proves he can even keep you reading when the main character is a serial killer I suppose you could compare it to American Psycho , but it stands on it s own as a chilling diary of a mass murderer.


  9. Heather Heather says:

    What s so creepy about this book is that, by having the serial killer as the narrator, it asks you to empathize with root for a sociopath I can t hear the words head movies without visible cringing.


  10. John John says:

    Think, Henry, Portrait of a Serial Killer meets Forrest Gump We take in the 60 s through the early 80 s through a psycho s perspective There is some other stuff about obsession and killing typical of Ellroy The psychology stuff is neat.


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Killer on the Road[Reading] ➿ Killer on the Road ➶ James Ellroy – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk Martin Michael Plunkett is a product of his times the possessor of a genius intellect, a pitiless soul of brushed steel, and a heart of blackest evil With criminal tendencies forged in the fires of LA Martin Michael Plunkett is a product of his times the possessor of a genius intellect, a pitiless soul of brushed steel, and a heart of blackest evil With criminal tendencies forged in the fires of LA s Charles Killer on ePUB ↠ Manson hysteria, he comes to the bay city of San Francisco and submits to savage and terrible impulses that reveal to him his true vocation as a pure and perfect murderer And so begins his decade of discovery and terror, as he cuts a bloody swath across the full length of a land, ingeniously exploiting and feeding upon a society s obsessions As he maneuvers deftly through a seamy world of drugs, flesh, and perversions, the media will call him many things but Martin Plunkett s real name is Death His brilliant, twisted mind is a horriying place to explore His madness reflects a nation s own The killer is on the road And there s nowhere in America to hide.


About the Author: James Ellroy

James Ellroy was born in Los Angeles in His LA Quartet novels The Black Dahlia, The Big Nowhere, LA Confidential, and White Jazz were international best sellers His novel American Tabloid was Time magazine s Best Book Killer on ePUB ↠ fiction of his memoir, My Dark Places, was a Time Best Book of the Year and a New York Times Notable Book for His novel The Cold Six Thousand was a New York Times Notable Book and a Los Angeles Times Best Book for Ellroy lives in Los AngelesEllroy is known for a telegraphic writing style, which omits words other writers would consider necessary, and often features sentence fragments His books are noted for their dark humor and depiction of American authoritarianism Other hallmarks of his work include dense plotting and a relentlessly pessimistic worldview Ellroy has been called the Demon Dog of American crime fiction See also.