The European Witch Craze in the Sixteenth &

The European Witch Craze in the Sixteenth &


The European Witch Craze in the Sixteenth & Seventeenth Century & Other Essays ★ [PDF / Epub] ☄ The European Witch Craze in the Sixteenth & Seventeenth Century & Other Essays By Hugh Trevor-Roper ✪ – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk The European Witch Hunt Goodare, Julian Livres NotRetrouvez The European Witch Hunt et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasionThe European Witch Hunt By Goodare, JulianNotRetrouv The European Witch Hunt Witch Craze Epub ß Goodare, Julian Livres NotRetrouvez The European Witch Hunt et des millions de livres The European Epub / en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasionThe European Witch Hunt By Goodare, JulianNotRetrouvez The European Witch Hunt By European Witch Craze Epub µ Goodare, Julian December,et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasion The European Witch Hunt English Edition eBook GoodareAchetez et tlchargez ebook The European Witch Hunt English Edition Boutique Kindle MagicReligionThe European witch craze We don t know exactly how many people primarily women were formally executed or informally lynched during the European witch craze Sam Harris writes Witches, in all likelihood, did notEuropean witchcraft WikipediaThe European Witch Hunts JW A FEW centuries ago in Europe, the fear of witchcraft led to witch hunts and executions These occurred largely in France, Germany, northern Italy, Switzerland, and the Low Countries Belgium, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands The European Witch HuntGoodare, Rita Voltmer, University of Trier, Germany Julian Goodare s The European Witch Hunt is a valuable addition to the study of early modern witchcraft and witch hunting Goodare devotes extra attention to explaining the mentalities, both illiterate and erudite, that converged to create the stereotype of the witch The European Witch Hunts A Mass Murder of The idea of the European witch trials as a mass murder of women has been refuted by Keith Thomas, who disagrees on the basis that witchcraft did not affect all women.

    The European Witch Craze in the Sixteenth & English Edition eBook GoodareAchetez et tlchargez ebook The European Witch Hunt English Edition Boutique Kindle MagicReligionThe European witch craze We don t know exactly how many people primarily women were formally executed or informally lynched during the European witch craze Sam Harris writes Witches, in all likelihood, did notEuropean witchcraft WikipediaThe European Witch Hunts JW A FEW centuries ago in Europe, the fear of witchcraft led to witch hunts and executions These occurred largely in France, Germany, northern Italy, Switzerland, and the Low Countries Belgium, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands The European Witch HuntGoodare, Rita Voltmer, University of Trier, Germany Julian Goodare s The European Witch Hunt is a valuable addition to the study of early modern witchcraft and witch hunting Goodare devotes extra attention to explaining the mentalities, both illiterate and erudite, that converged to create the stereotype of the witch The European Witch Hunts A Mass Murder of The idea of the European witch trials as a mass murder of women has been refuted by Keith Thomas, who disagrees on the basis that witchcraft did not affect all women."/>
  • Paperback
  • 144 pages
  • The European Witch Craze in the Sixteenth & Seventeenth Century & Other Essays
  • Hugh Trevor-Roper
  • English
  • 10 August 2019
  • 0061314161

About the Author: Hugh Trevor-Roper

Hugh Redwald Trevor Roper, Witch Craze Epub ß Baron Dacre of Glanton, FBA, was an English historian of early modern Britain The European Epub / and Nazi Germany He was Regius Professor of Modern History at the University of Oxford.



10 thoughts on “The European Witch Craze in the Sixteenth & Seventeenth Century & Other Essays

  1. Vaishali Vaishali says:

    Far too opinionated, and far too academic in narration.All notes are solely from Chapter 3 the only section unfraught with endless citations and run on sentences There can be no doubt that the witch craze grew, and grew terribly, after the Renaissance For in the Dark Age, there was at least no witch craze There were witch beliefs, of course a scattered folklore of peasant superstitions the casting of spells, the making of storms, converse with spirits, sympathetic magic Such b Far too opinionated, and far too academic in narration.All notes are solely from Chapter 3 the only section unfraught with endless citations and run on sentences There can be no doubt that the witch craze grew, and grew terribly, after the Renaissance For in the Dark Age, there was at least no witch craze There were witch beliefs, of course a scattered folklore of peasant superstitions the casting of spells, the making of storms, converse with spirits, sympathetic magic Such beliefs are universal In the 8th century St Boniface, the English Apostle of Germany, declared loudly, that to believe in witches and werewolves is unchristian In the same century Charlemagne decreed the death penalty for anyone who, in newly converted Saxony, burnt supposed witches Such burning, he said, was a pagan custom John Nider wrote what has been called the the first popular essay on witches Formicarius, the Ant Heap , and was based principally on confessions of Swiss witches collected by a Swiss magistrate, Peter of Berne In the next hundred years some famous inquisitors were busy in the Alpine valleys in 1485, according to the Malleus, the inquisitor of Cuomo burnt 41 witches, all of whom confessed to sexual intercourse with incubi The witch craze would always be associated particularly with the highlands Either the Jew or the witch will do, but society will settle for the nearest The Dominicans, an international order, hate both but whereas in the Alps and the Pyrenees they pursue witches, in Spain they concentrate on Jews With Jews and Moors on their hands, the Spanish inquisitors had very little time for witches, and so they have won glowing tributes for their firmness and temperate wisdom in this respect In medieval Hungary witches were sentenced, for a first offense, to stand all day in a public place, wearing a Jew s hat Witchcraft was one of the charges often made against the Jews Judicial torture had been allowed in limited cases by Roman law but Roman law, and with it its judicial torture, had been forgotten in the Dark Ages Witches confessions do not, at first, appear before secular tribunals, but only before the tribunals of the Inquisition In other words, they were only obtained by the courts who used torture Switzerland had to wipe out whole villages to keep them down Travellers in Lorraine may see thousands and thousands of stakes stakes to which Nicholas Remy was sending them Remy was a cultivated scholar, an eleganr Latin poet having sent we are told two to three thousand victims to the stake The most ferocious of witch burning princes, we find, are also the most cultured patrons of contemporary learning Heinrich Julius, Duke of Brunswick was skilled in mathematics, chemistry, natural science, Latin, Greek, and Hebrew In his lifetime, says a chronicler, Lechelnholze Square in Wolfenbuttel looked like a little forest, so crowded were the stakes Philip Adolf von Ehrenberg of Wurzurg was partcularly active in his reign of 8 years 1623 31 he burnt 900 persons, including his own nephew, 19 Catholic priests, and children of 7 who were said to have had intercourse with demons In Cromwellian England the 1650 s saw an outbreak of books repudiating witch trials If the last witch burning in Europe was in Catholic Poland in 1793, that was an illegal act witch trials had been abolished in Poland in 1787

  2. Caterina Fake Caterina Fake says:

    Last night I was reading H.R Trevor Roper s classic work The European Witch Craze of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, which I was quite enjoying In the first chapter, Trevor Roper was discussing various clerical theories of how the Devil managed to beget offspring after having sex with witches at night in the form of an incubus, that visited female witches or a succubus, that visited male witches But this was a problem wasn t the devil neuter A great deal of theological thinking was Last night I was reading H.R Trevor Roper s classic work The European Witch Craze of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, which I was quite enjoying In the first chapter, Trevor Roper was discussing various clerical theories of how the Devil managed to beget offspring after having sex with witches at night in the form of an incubus, that visited female witches or a succubus, that visited male witches But this was a problem wasn t the devil neuter A great deal of theological thinking was expended in the attempt to resolve this matter Some thought the Devil swiped the testicles off the dead and impregnated the witches with borrowed vital essences, but the church eventually followed the teaching of St Thomas Aquinas, the second founder of demonology after St Augustine He said the Devil could only discharge as incubus what he had previously absorbed as succubus Trevor Roper then remarks There are times when the intellectual fantasies of the clergy seembizarre than the psychopathic delusions of the madhouse out of which they have, too often, been excogitated.Excellent for other reasons not adumbrated here

  3. Joseph Ramsden Joseph Ramsden says:

    I read this book to clue me up on the Witch Craze so I could teach it at A level, and clue me up it did The reason I didn t give it 5 stars is that it s contextually vague By that I mean it takes for granted that you are aware of everything to do with the context surrounding the craze, and I wasn t However, if you read it in conjunction with a textbook and are prepared to hit Google up to find out who the hell the Albigensians are and cetera then it s worth a read.

  4. Glinsky Glinsky says:

    Formidably pompous, staggeringly arrogant, dismissively narrow minded, and fairly groaning under the weight of opinionated prejudice In short, every bit as much the provincial reine de villageas many another at Oxford at this time.

  5. Paul Lawrence Paul Lawrence says:

    This a short volume, a kind of long essay with chapters, which details very clearly the origins of the witch hunts of the 16th and 17th centuries.The exploits of Matthew Hopkins in England, are well known Between 1644 and 1646 he hadthen 300 people put to death What is less well known is that this 300 was of only about 1,000 killed in total in England between 1542 and 1736 In other words, witch hunting in England was not widespread, not compared to other parts of Europe Witch hunting g This a short volume, a kind of long essay with chapters, which details very clearly the origins of the witch hunts of the 16th and 17th centuries.The exploits of Matthew Hopkins in England, are well known Between 1644 and 1646 he hadthen 300 people put to death What is less well known is that this 300 was of only about 1,000 killed in total in England between 1542 and 1736 In other words, witch hunting in England was not widespread, not compared to other parts of Europe Witch hunting generally seems to have sprung up at times of religious uncertainty or economic depression, so it is unlikely to be coincidence that Matthew Hopkins committed his evil deeds during the English Civil War,at a time when parliament were particular sensitive to Charles I suspected catholicism, and when many people suffered as a consequence of war.Widespread persecution of witches originated in mainland Europe, in the 12th century, as the Catholic church sought to overcome the heretical Albigensians of Languedoc and the Vaudois of the Alps The Dominican order was founded to combat these heretics, and was successful in evangelizing both Alpine and Pyrenean valleys Yet pagal customs lingered The new heresy of witchcraft was a means by which the Catholic church sought to stamp out the casting of spells and the making of magic In 1326 Pope John XXII authorized the full use of inquisitorial procedure of witches, and so began the wholesale persecution that would lastthan three centuriesTrevor Roper explains in detail the religious origins of witchcraft, and the way in which witchery became a front for the murderous exploits of religious conformists As the back of the book says The European Witch Craze is a stunning picture of intellectual and social life in the grip of a collective psychosis

  6. Hank Pharis Hank Pharis says:

    After reading the Stacy Schiff s book on the Salem witch trials I wanted to read something about the European witch executions 2 3 dozen witches were executed in Salem But it is estimated that as many as 600,000 were executed in Europe.A couple of significant quotes What then is the explanation of those confessions, and of their general identity When we read the confessions of sixteenth and seventeenth century witches, we are often revolted by the cruelty and stupidity which have elicite After reading the Stacy Schiff s book on the Salem witch trials I wanted to read something about the European witch executions 2 3 dozen witches were executed in Salem But it is estimated that as many as 600,000 were executed in Europe.A couple of significant quotes What then is the explanation of those confessions, and of their general identity When we read the confessions of sixteenth and seventeenth century witches, we are often revolted by the cruelty and stupidity which have elicited them and sometimes, undoubtedly, supplied their form But equally we are obliged to admit their fundamental subjective reality For every victim whose story is evidently created or improved by torture, there are two or three who genuinely believe in its truth This duality forbids us to accept single, comprehensive, rational explanations 123 Thus, if we look at the revival of the witch craze in the 1560s in its context, we see that it is not the product either of Protestantism or of Catholicism, but of both

  7. Brian Brian says:

    Renaissance, Reformation, Counter reformation, Enlightenment.quite a time in European history The standout essay in this book of essays is the titular namesake The European witchcraze of the sixteenth and seventeenth century quite amazing how bad information can become legitimized through continuous referencing of subsequent works similar to an echo chamber effect How the evolution of terms created a new heresy and resulted in the death of thousands of innocent people After all, no on Renaissance, Reformation, Counter reformation, Enlightenment.quite a time in European history The standout essay in this book of essays is the titular namesake The European witchcraze of the sixteenth and seventeenth century quite amazing how bad information can become legitimized through continuous referencing of subsequent works similar to an echo chamber effect How the evolution of terms created a new heresy and resulted in the death of thousands of innocent people After all, no one was a witch, there were no witch s sabbat, no succubi succubus, no communing with the devil which is why these people were tortured and burned It was all a religious madness that swept these innocent people intothe pyres Well, it made Dominic and Francis saints, so it is all good.Other essays spoke to the religious origins of the enlightenmentor rather how a strong secular lay government that kept the orthodox in check allowed the enlightenment to take seed A brilliant book

  8. Hamilton Carvalho Hamilton Carvalho says:

    A rich account of the phenomenon, placing it in its social, political and religious context and roots Excellent book I mentally thank the author for not employing a marxist lens in his analysis on the contrary I strongly recommend this book.

  9. Julaine Julaine says:

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