Women of the French Revolution MOBI ¾ Women of

Women of the French Revolution MOBI ¾ Women of


Women of the French Revolution ❴Reading❵ ➽ Women of the French Revolution Author Linda Kelly – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk On may , , Madame de Stael, daughter of the finance minister Jacques Necker, watched the opening procession of the States General Seven years later, on the eve of his departure for Italy and glory, Jo On may Madame de Stael, the French PDF/EPUB ç daughter of the finance minister Jacques Necker, watched the opening procession of the States General Seven years later, on the eve of his departure for Italy and glory, Josephine de Bauharnais married the young Napoleon Bonaparte Between these two dates the French Revolution had run its course At every stage, women, whether as witnesses or participants, were closely associated with its main events Their experiences, recorded in the letters and memoirs of the day, give a fresh slant on the revolution s often told story and Women of PDF/EPUB or incidentally cast a light on women s lot in general at the time.


10 thoughts on “Women of the French Revolution

  1. Antigone Antigone says:

    Despite its remarkable resemblance to something that fell off a carrel shelf at the local elementary school, Linda Kelly has produced a fiendishly terrific little volume here In it, she traces the path of several conspicuous figures of the French Revolution and draws our attention deftly to the fact that, in such a day and age, conspicuous was all a woman might feasibly aspire to Although the assemblies, councils, clubs and pamphlets sounded their insurrectionary claxon for equality across a Despite its remarkable resemblance to something that fell off a carrel shelf at the local elementary school, Linda Kelly has produced a fiendishly terrific little volume here In it, she traces the path of several conspicuous figures of the French Revolution and draws our attention deftly to the fact that, in such a day and age, conspicuous was all a woman might feasibly aspire to Although the assemblies, councils, clubs and pamphlets sounded their insurrectionary claxon for equality across all spheres and territories of French life, a line was drawn at gender No woman would be elected to represent a town or a faction, to hold an office, to manage an issue or dictate a term They made a lovely garland to the phalanx of a protest and added a certain spice to the reportage, but they were not to be taken seriously or invested with an ounce of legitimate sway Such was the hypocrisy a woman faced when confronting the revolutionary corridor of power And so it was as most of these old stories go, she did her best to work around it.Kelly reserves most of her focus for six of the leading lights of Parisian public life Madame de Stael, Madame de la Tour du Pin, Theroigne de Mericourt, Madame Roland, Olympe de Gouges and the dark horse here Josephine Beauharnais Each receives the benefit of an objective accounting enriched by insight and genuine compassion The biographies weave, as they must in every revolutionary tapestry, around and across, above and beneath travails glancing one off the other through the force of a series of momentous events What drove one woman into exile would thrust another to the forefront by the promotion of a husband or the opening of a salon Several of these women wrote, all of them campaigned each risked life and limb to remain in some way relevant to the cause she held dear and the time she lived in.As to those who moved me most, the bounty makes a choice difficult Is it Theroigne, swathed in her blood red cloak, sabre by her side, two pistols at her waist, charging through so many riots, down so many streets Kidnapped by the Austrian government and rigorously put to question, she returned to France a broken soul yet no less fierce in her conviction Perhaps it is Olympe, the playwright, determined to exercise her prerogative to say whatever came into her head, until the Revolutionary tribunal saw no recourse but to take this troublesome body part from her Or perhaps a personage from the second tier that dark beauty, the Marquise de Fontaney, whom hard circumstance forced into the bed of the vicious Tallien and who, through sheer guile and careful manipulation, managed to save so many from the guillotine only to be ostracized in later years by the very people for whom she d made the effort A fair number of Kelly s accounts are absolutely fascinating.It s an old book, published first in 1987, yet if you come across a copy Well worth a look


  2. Constance Wallace Constance Wallace says:

    As a soon to be graduate student in French Studies, Linda Kelly s book is great tool for investigating the roles of women with regards to the French Revolution As I constructed my paper for presentation, her work was relied on greatly Easy to understand, a smooth text, the reader will have no difficultly in grasping the historical context of Ms Kelly s writing Recommended for those who are interested in Women s studies or their role in the French Revolution.


  3. Wanjiru Thoithi Wanjiru Thoithi says:

    This is a book I happened to just pick up off a shelf I have a poor knowledge of the French Revolution This book was easy to read and compelling Very seamless I am off to researchon these women.


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