A is for Ox: A Short History of the Alphabet ePUB · A

A is for Ox: A Short History of the Alphabet ePUB · A


10 thoughts on “A is for Ox: A Short History of the Alphabet

  1. Rossdavidh Rossdavidh says:

    For some reason, I always assumed that the alphabetor less arrived as a set, stepping onto the stage of history as a group of 26 I never really gave the matter much thought, of course, or I would have realized that it could not possibly have happened that way, but it wasn t until I read this book that I learned how they came about Some evolved out of ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs, some came from Phoenician, and others from early Semitic This little book, after an introduction to the gene For some reason, I always assumed that the alphabetor less arrived as a set, stepping onto the stage of history as a group of 26 I never really gave the matter much thought, of course, or I would have realized that it could not possibly have happened that way, but it wasn t until I read this book that I learned how they came about Some evolved out of ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs, some came from Phoenician, and others from early Semitic This little book, after an introduction to the general lay of the historical and prehistorical land, takes us through the development of each one.Five of our letters F, U, V, W, and Y all came from the same ancient semitic letter waw , which meant peg Hence, F is for peg A , on the other hand, came from an ancient Egyptian hieroglyph which resembled the head of an ox Hence, A is for ox , which gives the book its name Each letter s mini chapter takes us through its development into Greek, Etruscan, Roman, medieval Carolingian, 15th century humanist, and eventually modern forms I was also surprised to learn that several of our letters were not quite into their modern shape when the 1700 s began, although the f like form of the letter s reminded me that I already knew about at least one case like that.I mostly read this book at night, one letter per night There is something relaxing about reading a brief two pages summary of how several thousand years of history had their affect on one little corner of the human mind It gives you the very opposite perspective of a what went horribly wrong with the world in the last 15 minutes viewpoint from the least healthy corners of the internet.It is in the nature of the alphabet, that we don t think about it very much The beautiful calligraphy of the uncial medieval manuscripts from 4th 8th centuries is not as convenient to read, perhaps for precisely the same reasons that make them so pleasant to look at The proper task for a letter is to allow you to look past it, not really noticing it as itself but just the words that it makes up But, there is a quiet satisfaction to be gained from looking closely at something which you normally take for granted, especially something as extraordinarily useful as the alphabet It didn t just happen somebody had to have the idea, but like riverbed stones smoothed to roundness by the passage of time and tumbling, the letters have been slowly and intermittently evolved until for example an ox head becomes A , and then eventually a Like picking up that rounded riverbed stone in your hand and enjoying for a few moments the feel of it, it was a source of relaxation, almost meditative, to think for a few minutes about only one letter, where it came from, and how it got that way


  2. Steve Wales Steve Wales says:

    What a fascinating and beautiful little book The first half traces the development of the alphabet as a system of writing, representingor less one symbol per sound Specifically it covers the Latin alphabet as used in modern English, rather than, say, modern Greek or Cyrillic, from hieroglyphs though other forms such as cuneiform as they developed around the Mediterranean region, mainly for use in trade Photographs and illustrations give a clear comparison of the different types of scri What a fascinating and beautiful little book The first half traces the development of the alphabet as a system of writing, representingor less one symbol per sound Specifically it covers the Latin alphabet as used in modern English, rather than, say, modern Greek or Cyrillic, from hieroglyphs though other forms such as cuneiform as they developed around the Mediterranean region, mainly for use in trade Photographs and illustrations give a clear comparison of the different types of script.The second half switches from the general system to the specific characters, tracing the development of the 26 letters of the English alphabet as far back as is known In each case there is a timeline of different representations of the same letter, in some cases as far back as Egyptian hieroglyphs, demonstrating the development of the Roman capital letters and the later hand written lowercase, with an explanation of the changes along the way.A fantastically informative and beautiful little book, now sadly out of print, but it s well worth looking for a second hand copy on eBay


  3. Simon Pressinger Simon Pressinger says:

    A really interesting overview of the history of our alphabet, looking at how it came about, where it came from and how it evolved into these marks before your very eyes From the inventors of writing the Sumerians , through to Egyptian and Mayan hieroglyphs, the Hittite and Chinese logograms and pictograms, to the seafaring Phoenicians who spread the developing alphabet around the Mediterranean, passing it on to the Greeks and the Etruscans who developed it further, and then to the Romans who s A really interesting overview of the history of our alphabet, looking at how it came about, where it came from and how it evolved into these marks before your very eyes From the inventors of writing the Sumerians , through to Egyptian and Mayan hieroglyphs, the Hittite and Chinese logograms and pictograms, to the seafaring Phoenicians who spread the developing alphabet around the Mediterranean, passing it on to the Greeks and the Etruscans who developed it further, and then to the Romans who shaped the stylised capitals and cursive forms that we re most familiar with It s quite a story And a short read too This is a really nice Folio Society edition, with off white pages, colourful pictures and even the pleasing red headers and sub headers typical of 17th and 18th century texts, which is a nice touch


  4. Antonio Gallo Antonio Gallo says:

    Have you ever wondered why the letters are shaped the way they are Why each particular shape came to represent its specific sound Why certain letters have alternative shapes and why we use two alphabets capitals and small letters Searching for the answers to questions like these will lead to encounters with Egyptian slaves, freebooting Phoenicians, Greek colonists, Roman sign writers, Carolingian intellectuals, and excitable Renaissance bibliophiles.


  5. Alex Alex says:

    A fun, light read which gives lots of insight into the development of the alphabet and letterforms over the centuries.


  6. Jacob Lines Jacob Lines says:

    A is for ox, B is for house, C is for throwing stick But you already knew that, right This book has it all it s gorgeous, it comes in its own box, and it talks about writing The history of our alphabet in particular I find the history of writing to be almost as interesting as writing itself In this slim book, Davies recounts how writing began, how alphabets came to be, and how our alphabet spread Then there is a section explaining each letter individually, complete with lovely examples o A is for ox, B is for house, C is for throwing stick But you already knew that, right This book has it all it s gorgeous, it comes in its own box, and it talks about writing The history of our alphabet in particular I find the history of writing to be almost as interesting as writing itself In this slim book, Davies recounts how writing began, how alphabets came to be, and how our alphabet spread Then there is a section explaining each letter individually, complete with lovely examples of the evolution of each letter from Phoenician to Latin It really is a delightful book And did I mention how nice the book looks Nice paper, smart binding, a box to keep it in It was totally worth the 12 I paid at a used book store


  7. Nicholas Whyte Nicholas Whyte says:

    decent little book on the origins of the alphabet, the first half being about the global question of how the Latin script developed from hieroglyphics via cuneiform, Phoenician, Greek and etruscan, and the second half taking each letter individually I ve read several books on this topic so not much was new to me the information is very much presented for the non specialist, and readers may well wonder what the sounds were precisely that were represente decent little book on the origins of the alphabet, the first half being about the global question of how the Latin script developed from hieroglyphics via cuneiform, Phoenician, Greek and etruscan, and the second half taking each letter individually I ve read several books on this topic so not much was new to me the information is very much presented for the non specialist, and readers may well wonder what the sounds were precisely that were represented by the Semitic letters aleph and ayin


  8. Meg Drummond-Wilson Meg Drummond-Wilson says:

    A clear, concise and interesting history I don t know much about linguistics so I can t speak for the authenticity of what Davies is saying but it s certainly well presented, nicely detailed and easy to follow for the beginner It s short, filled with lovely visuals and infused throughout with the human interest inherent in good information about past societies, which is a quality that always makes history nerds get excited Definitely not an intimidating read I enjoyed it a lot.


  9. Sarah Haselden Sarah Haselden says:

    Absolutely fascinating and an essential for any language nerds out there


  10. Curt Curt says:

    what a fun little book and a beautiful volume so much is really still unknown about the origins of the alphabet this book fills in many of the blanks.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


A is for Ox: A Short History of the Alphabet [EPUB] ✰ A is for Ox: A Short History of the Alphabet Author Lyn Davies – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk A brief study of what constitutes an alphabet and how the Western alphabet has evolved, from the time of the Sumerians through the present day A brief study of for Ox: Kindle Ð what constitutes an alphabet and how the Western alphabet has evolved, from the time of the Sumerians through the present day.

  • Hardcover
  • 127 pages
  • A is for Ox: A Short History of the Alphabet
  • Lyn Davies
  • English
  • 12 February 2018

About the Author: Lyn Davies

Is a well known for Ox: Kindle Ð author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the A is for Ox: A Short History of the Alphabet book, this is one of the most wanted Lyn Davies author readers around A is MOBI :å the world.