Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of

Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of


Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything ➤ [Epub] ➞ Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything By Joshua Foer ➮ – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk The blockbuster phenomenon that charts an amazing journey of the mind while revolutionizing our concept of memoryAn instant bestseller that is poised to become a classic, Moonwalking with Einstein rec The blockbuster phenomenon that charts an amazing Einstein: The PDF ´ journey of the mind while revolutionizing our concept of memoryAn instant bestseller that is poised to become a classic, Moonwalking with Einstein recounts Joshua Foer s yearlong quest to improve his memory under the tutelage of top mental athletes He draws on cutting edge Moonwalking with PDF or research, a surprising cultural history of remembering, and venerable tricks of the mentalist s trade to transform our understanding of human memory From the United States Memory Championship to deep within the author s own mind, this is an electrifying work of journalism that reminds us that, in every way that matters, with Einstein: The PDF ☆ we are the sum of our memories.


10 thoughts on “Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything

  1. Steve Steve says:

    Here s the hook Suppose you want to commit the items on your to do list to memory because you don t have a pencil and paper The first five items on your list are 1 Buy a bottle of Bordeaux for tonight s dinner party2 Put Trainspotting at the front of the Netflix queue3 Finish the office TPS reports before the weekend4 Pick up the copy of The Master and Margarita that s on hold at the library5 Check the Haile Selassie wiki entry to see if the account of the attempted coup in Cutting for St Here s the hook Suppose you want to commit the items on your to do list to memory because you don t have a pencil and paper The first five items on your list are 1 Buy a bottle of Bordeaux for tonight s dinner party2 Put Trainspotting at the front of the Netflix queue3 Finish the office TPS reports before the weekend4 Pick up the copy of The Master and Margarita that s on hold at the library5 Check the Haile Selassie wiki entry to see if the account of the attempted coup in Cutting for Stone was factualThe list may be much longer than this, but the shortened version above will illustrate the point well enough Research shows we remember mental images of things much better than we do raw data by rote things like numbers, playing cards, poems, or list items Most people can only keep a random sequence of about 7 digits in their heads at a time when first hearing them Memory experts have found that by transforming any sequence of things into pictures instead, and sticking these pictures in what they call a memory palace, that we can recall them mucheffectively An example should help show this.First of all, we need to visualize a place we know very well This is the memory palace In fact, the home you grew up in, while it may not have been a real palace, is probably rich in the kind of recallable detail that can help in retaining long sequences We then position the mental images associated with the objects we re trying to remember along a path within the home In my case, that might mean I come to the front door where a little doe say Bambi s girlfriend Faline is resting You can tell by her eyes that she s bored, though She s a Bordeaux I know it s bad, but this is going to work Let the image burn into your brain for a moment Once inside at the base of the stairs in the foyer I come to a freight car of a model train It looks ridiculous spotted with pink polka dots, but hey, it s a way to remember Trainspotting Up the stairs on the left is a faux antique table On it sits our mnemonic for TPS miniature tepees And just to make itmemorable, imagine that a teenager lives inside one of them and it was TPed with Charmin I was tempted to have Lumbergh say Ummm yeah at this point, but wasn t sure that Office Space was a universal reference Then it s a quick right into the living room In the middle of it is a big hot tub, but instead of water inside, it s a giant margarita The drink comes complete with salt around the edge of the tub and a wedge cut from a lime the size of a beach ball Inside the tub is a miniature ship with a master on board shouting orders Some of the crew look like they wouldn t mind walking the plank Finally, through the entry way into the kitchen I see Marley s ghost Bob Marley, that is and he s sitting on the table with doctor writer extraordinaire Abraham Verghese In case the link to Haile Selassie isn t clear, he was also known as Ras Tafari, viewed by many a Jamaican as a messianic figure Surprisingly enough, Marley is not holding anything rolled up and burning he s got a dove perched on his hand instead and it s cooing which, of course, is auditorially equivalent to coup ing.So there s our list Picture it in sequence onetime the bored doe just inside the door, the spotted train at the base of the stairs, the tepees on the table at the top of the stairs, the ship master in the margarita in the living room, and finally, sitting on the kitchen table, the Selassie worshipper with the author of Cutting for Stone and the cooing dove I could presumably have had dozens of these images stuck along a path throughout the house The placement along a set route say up the stairs and clockwise, hitting every room helps since that way we aren t as apt to skip anything Experts also say it s best to choose images that are ridiculous or racy or in any other wayapt to stick in your head That pretty much covers the trick to memorization To get an entire book out of the deal, though, Foer had to expand the scope He started out mentioning the remarkable feats the elite memorizers can perform x digits of pi, y decks of cards, z lines of verse He then got into the small but interesting world of competitive memorization, including his own involvement Foer began his investigation on a journalistic whim and ended up, with hard work and a lot of help from memory mentors, becoming the US champion Even though the end result of his competition is mentioned at the outset, there is drama in how it unfolds The competition involves several categories, one of which is memorizing card sequences The trick in doing that is an offshoot of what I described above The difference is that every card has a mental image associated with it that you spend days and days drilling into your head beforehand Each mental image has a subject and a verb The ace of clubs may be Karl Spackler the Cinderella boy himself teeing off at Augusta The two of clubs may be Groucho Marx lighting a cigar And so on for each card in the deck Then, when you want to memorize the randomized order of a deck, you put these images in a fresh memory palace Only to make fewer images necessary, you can join the subject of one card with the action of the next card into a single image If the first card is the seven of diamonds which you may have associated with Einstein twirling the tassel on his mortarboard and the next one is the jack of spades which is J.D Salinger moonwalking, say then the pair of those cards together would produce an image of Einstein moonwalking Memorizing the deck would then involve 26 images There may be variations, but that s the basic approach Sequences of digits are done similarly, only for that you may have 100 different pre memorized images one for each pair in the range from 00 to 99 Foer points out that our memories don t get much of a workout these days We all know how easy it is to rely on spell checks and Google searches for things we used to keep in our heads So is it useful to keepinformation available for immediate use Probably Foer argues that our ideas, abstractions, and arguments depend on recallable units that are the building blocks What Foer does not do as effectively is demonstrate how the aforementioned devices help with that kind of practical memory He admits to it, too, though only after he tells his fun story of the US Memory Championship The mental athletes he first encountered were not what he d expected They were not savants, nor did they possess photographic memories Rather, they d all learned these visualization techniques that date back to the ancient Greeks The top competitors were often the ones with the most creative images After being coached by several top mnemonists, Foer was able to compete with the best in the US He said he still loses his keys, though.There wasto this book as well However, and I say this with a full appreciation of the irony, I don t remember much of it It was several months ago There was a partial debunking of the savant from 60 Minutes who was born on a blue day , there was a bit on the tricks in reciting poems, and there was the blow by blow action of the memory competition My impression at the time was that it was all fairly interesting, but not very useful in the end.So who remembers the to do list Would you have remembered it without the images I just tested myself and I can recite it back without error, but then I ve made six rounds of edits to this stupid review I d probably remember it anyway Besides that, I usually have a pencil and paper


  2. J J says:

    Unimpressive This is a great example of how misleading a book title can be I d give it one and a half stars but it is just not worth two Moonwalking with Einstein The Art Science of Remembering Everything reads like a long magazine article which is kind of where I found out about the book The NY Times last week Having read the article, I was sufficiently impressed to get online and order the book It arrived four days later and I couldn t wait to get started At the onset of his boo Unimpressive This is a great example of how misleading a book title can be I d give it one and a half stars but it is just not worth two Moonwalking with Einstein The Art Science of Remembering Everything reads like a long magazine article which is kind of where I found out about the book The NY Times last week Having read the article, I was sufficiently impressed to get online and order the book It arrived four days later and I couldn t wait to get started At the onset of his book which does have a snappy title Foer was very clear this is not a how to book but rather, it is an account of his one year journey from being a journalist spectator to becoming winner of the US Memory Championship Maybe that s where I got off track The NY Times article, detailed as it was, failed to mention that part Its a critical detailthan an oversight in my estimation.Foer has a decent writing style again, like a magazine article This book is written in the vein of Malcolm Gladwell s books and it does have information but not quite as polished or as jam packed So far, hardly anything that wasn t already mentioned on the NY Times synopsis has been written and little has been added to what I already read so I am feeling just a little bit ripped off the subtitle seems to imply that the book will talk about, the art and science of remembering everything For the sake of accuracy, it should read My year long journey toward becoming the US Memory champion with a few interesting tidbits about memory thrown in for good measure I d give this book a grade of B for style and an overall grade of D because it was not at all what it was hyped to be The discontinuity between Foer s book title and its content are such that if I ever come across this writer s books again, I am going to be hard pressed to trust him enough to plop down my hard earned money because I will be less likely to fall for that trick twice.Foer s synopsis on the NY Times deserves an A over, since he failed to expand the book that s where the material should have stayed.I am going to be recommending the NY Times synopsis penned by the author and which turns out to be 14.00 shipping cheaper not to mention, the article is ironicallydirected at hard examples of just how memory techniques can be applied I suppose if there is anything redeeming about Foer s book is its extensive bibliography.Other than that, save your money and check this book out at your local library where you can also photocopy the bibliography because it will offerdetail germane to the topic


  3. Diane Diane says:

    Ignore the ridiculous title Forget the hideous book cover This is a fun and interesting read once you get past those stumbling blocks Joshua Foer was a journalist who wrote a story on the U.S Memory Championship, and he became so intrigued by the chance to improve his memory that he spent a year training to become a mental athlete The book covers his year spent learning about mnemonics and memory palaces and all of the memorable ahem characters he met along the way My favorite sections Ignore the ridiculous title Forget the hideous book cover This is a fun and interesting read once you get past those stumbling blocks Joshua Foer was a journalist who wrote a story on the U.S Memory Championship, and he became so intrigued by the chance to improve his memory that he spent a year training to become a mental athlete The book covers his year spent learning about mnemonics and memory palaces and all of the memorable ahem characters he met along the way My favorite sections covered the history of memorization it goes back to the ancient Greeks, when Socrates famously complained that writing destroys memory and some inspiring passages on how to make your life seemfull Monotony collapses time novelty unfolds it You can exercise daily and eat healthily and live a long life, while experiencing a short one If you spend your life sitting in a cubicle and passing papers, one day is bound to blend unmemorably into the next and disappear That s why it s important to change routines regularly, and take vacations to exotic locales, and have as many new experiences as possible that can anchor our memories Creating new memories stretches out psychological time, and lengthens our perception of our lives The last chapter and the epilogue cover the memory championships in which Foer competed, but the outcome of those events really doesn t matter By then, it was clear that the purpose of a good memory isn t just for party tricks like memorizing a deck of cardsimportantly, it teaches you to becomemindful in your life


  4. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    Moonwalking with Einstein, Joshua Foer Moonwalking with Einstein The Art and Science of Remembering Everything is a nonfiction book by Joshua Foer, first published in 2011 Foer discusses how Daniel Tammet s index finger slides around on a table as he performs mental calculations in a documentary mental multiplication experts and mnemonists that Foer speaks with imply that Tammet s claims, involving synesthetic morphing shapes and colors standing in for complex numerical feats, are questionabl Moonwalking with Einstein, Joshua Foer Moonwalking with Einstein The Art and Science of Remembering Everything is a nonfiction book by Joshua Foer, first published in 2011 Foer discusses how Daniel Tammet s index finger slides around on a table as he performs mental calculations in a documentary mental multiplication experts and mnemonists that Foer speaks with imply that Tammet s claims, involving synesthetic morphing shapes and colors standing in for complex numerical feats, are questionable 2015 1393 390 9786006958095 20


  5. Richard Stephenson Richard Stephenson says:

    Let me see if I have this right pickled garlic, cottage cheese, Pete s Smoked Salmon, 6 bottles of champagne, 3 pairs of socks, hoola hoops, scuba diver in the sink, dry ice, send Sophia an email I think I messed it up, but there s some simple proof that memory techniques can be useful.Unfortunately, this book isn t about teaching memory techniques It s about Josh s journey to winning the biggest little award in the US which is NOT why I read this book.Sure, the overall story was int Let me see if I have this right pickled garlic, cottage cheese, Pete s Smoked Salmon, 6 bottles of champagne, 3 pairs of socks, hoola hoops, scuba diver in the sink, dry ice, send Sophia an email I think I messed it up, but there s some simple proof that memory techniques can be useful.Unfortunately, this book isn t about teaching memory techniques It s about Josh s journey to winning the biggest little award in the US which is NOT why I read this book.Sure, the overall story was interesting, there were some useful tips, and some real truths came out of the work However, this book is not, I repeat, about teaching the Art and Science of Remembering Everything I will admit I went into the book expecting much in the way of being taught some useful skills so my rating reflects this entry bias.Read it for a decently entertaining tale of participative journalism Read something else for working on your memory


  6. Trevor Trevor says:

    This wasn t a bad book I quite enjoyed some of it and the author sometimes had me laughing in the way you can t help but laugh the first time you see the last scene of the very first Star Wars movie About twenty years ago I first came across Tony Buzan I read a couple of his books and even learnt enough of his methods to be able to memorise an entire weekly shopping list and to go around the supermarket without paper The problem was that I quickly came to the conclusion that learning has This wasn t a bad book I quite enjoyed some of it and the author sometimes had me laughing in the way you can t help but laugh the first time you see the last scene of the very first Star Wars movie About twenty years ago I first came across Tony Buzan I read a couple of his books and even learnt enough of his methods to be able to memorise an entire weekly shopping list and to go around the supermarket without paper The problem was that I quickly came to the conclusion that learning has very little to do with remembering particularly when remembering is defined as keeping strings ofor less unconnected facts in mind There is quite a lot of this book dedicated to watching the author learn to remember a deck of cards in a very short time Perhaps, if I was a gambler, this might seem a muchworthwhile task However, like too many memory feats, this just seems like a waste of life Part of this book talks about learning poetry by heart and how hard this can be But he does say that at least with learning poetry by heart you can bring texts with you wherever you go This is the desert island scenario, but rather than getting to choose a book to bring with you at the last minute, you in fact spend your life ensuring you always have favourites with you just in case Now, this is a worthwhile thing to do, there is never a time when you can be bored if you can think your way through a great poem For years I used to memorise poems I have,or less by heart poems such as The Second Coming, La Figlia Chi Piange which I do with extravagant hand gestures and have tried and failed for years to learn Sonnet 129 the lists of nouns and the inversions trip me every time But it all comes in handy eventually I was talking to my mother the other day about growing older and was able to quote one of my remembered poems to her in full The cruel girls we loved Are over forty,Their subtle daughters Have stolen their beauty And with a blue stare Of cool surprise,They mock their anxious mothersWith their mothers eyes. Now that I ve checked my memory against the poem it seems I almost remembered it but couldn t quite remember what kind of surprise they had, I had it as cruel for a second time and the line breaks I remembered as fewer mine was a poem of four lines in total, but I still knew there was a big break between beauty and And A couple of weeks ago my eldest daughter and I were walking around St Kilda talking about this and that Now, St Kilda has lots of streets that are named after poets and we came to Herbert Street and I told her it was probably named after George Herbert, a poet she didn t know and so I started quoting The Collar God, I love that poem, I love it so very much I love how it gets increasingly annoyed with itself and how the end is the calm after the climax In fact, the rushing urgency of the poem is very much like sex, now I think of it.Ted Hughes has a wonderful book I can t recommend too highly called By Heart about the poems you should learn by heart and why.The problem with memory is that we think we know what it is but really, memory is muchcomplicated than we generally imagine I tend to think there are three kinds of memory recognition, recall and recollection Recall is the one that is most prized particularly by the Tony Buzan s of the world Being able to recall pi to 300 decimal places might seem a remarkable thing to some minds but as someone who would train huskies to turn and eat their adventurers after they had crossed the first ice field or on the call of the twentieth mush on their way to the North Pole, I have to say the whole thing seems rather pointless to me I ve never really liked the because it s there excuse for doing anything Recall is hard, and is often the only type of memory we bother testing but really, it is hard because it isn t something that we humans actually need all that often.We are infinitely better at recognition We may not remember names, but by god we remember faces and what those faces have meant to us Names are a recall task faces a recognition task There is a lovely experiment where people are shown a thousand photographs and asked to remember as many as they can Generally, people are only able to remember about 2% our recall is a very weak type of memory But if you add another thousand photos and show them to the people again and ask which photos they have seen before then you get about 98% right, our recognition ability is almost infallible. The point being, that if you want to remember something then you need to link it to your recognition memory, and not rely on your recall memory The memory palaces and techniques described in this book rely on this fact and virtually this fact alone.The third kind of memory is our most dangerous and also our most interesting We think we remember our lives in much the same way that these guys spending their time memorising cards remember lists of disconnected facts but actually, we don t remember disconnected facts in any sense at all well What we remember is story And facts tend to get twisted out of recognition if they don t fit with the story we have chosen to tell Try telling someone about a fight you had between with your partner and not only will the story prove to be rather self serving, but muchinterestingly if there is a way to compare what you have to say with what actually happened , your story will drop facts in ways that make for a good story rather than a true story We re collect facts to fit our narrative, sometimes adding some to help the story make sense, often dropping some that add nothing or that no longer fit.I got to witness this happening at the start of the year when I was on a jury We watched hours of film from hotel security cameras and we listened to people, good people, trying their best to tell the truth, but being repeatedly caught out completely misremembered something Sometimes the disbelief these witnesses felt in being proven they had misremembered a key fact clearly shown on the videotape in complete contradiction to what they had said was utterly remarkable to witness I ve known for a long time narrative flow trumps fact every time But I never knew quite how much that was the case until I sat in that jury box trying to decide if I could reconstruct the truth of what had happened that night from the all too fallible memories of a dozen or so witnesses.My point is that you can remember as many cards as you like, but recall memory is by far the least interesting of the three types of memory we humans have By far the most important is recollection it is the story we tell ourselves about our lives and therefore the story that structures how we experience the world past, present and future This has virtually nothing to do with recall, despite what we tell ourselves in some ways we could say recollection is the series of lies we tell to ourselves to help us make sense of our lives, but if they are lies, they are lies we believe implicitly and breathlessly.Like I said, I quite enjoyed this the guy got to compete in various memory events and shows that hard work brings rewards Buzan repeatedly talks about the education revolution his memory tricks will bring you might notice that in the twenty years since I first noticed him his revolution hasn t quite gotten off the ground But then, we ve waited longer for the second coming of Christ, so if Buzan wishes to slouch his way toward Bethlehem, who am I to stop him He seems to be making buckets of money in his widening gyre, if nothing else


  7. Stephanie *Extremely Stable Genius* Stephanie *Extremely Stable Genius* says:

    Cross posted atShelfinflictedPeople do the oddest things in the name of winning I m a competitive person as are most of you reviewers out there A few years ago I would have added the word very in front of competitive I ve mellowed as I ve aged but I remember the lengths I went to in order to be the best at whatever I deemed important But I m fairly certain I would not go to such lengths to win a memory competition.Joshua Foer thought it was a dandy idea..Joshua found himself in the worl Cross posted atShelfinflictedPeople do the oddest things in the name of winning I m a competitive person as are most of you reviewers out there A few years ago I would have added the word very in front of competitive I ve mellowed as I ve aged but I remember the lengths I went to in order to be the best at whatever I deemed important But I m fairly certain I would not go to such lengths to win a memory competition.Joshua Foer thought it was a dandy idea..Joshua found himself in the world of competitive memory when he decided he wanted to do a journalistic book about the subject and the people in it Apparently, and I didn t know this, there is a world competition for memory These people memorize long lists of numbers, decks on top of decks of cards, poetry.ect, all to repeat what they remember to some judges in hopes of winning My question was why What purpose could this possibly serve Who needs a skill like this and when would one have the need to memorize 20 decks of cards As the author points out in the book, we no longer need to remember much of anything these days, all our electronic gadgets serve as our external memory When was the last time you memorized a phone number Pretty close to a really flippin long time ago I would guess To accomplish the mind boggling feet of, say, memorizing the order of cards in many set of cards in just minutes, they use the technique called mnemonics What this is, is making a visual backdrop for each card, or number, or object and putting them in memorable situations doing strange things and apparently the raunchier the better Trust me you don t want to know what his mind had conjured up for Bill Clinton and a Watermelon, but I will never forget it Competition got the better of Foer, and he went from writing a book about memory competitors to being a competitor himself He wanted the American memory championship bad So bad he resorted to wearing blacked out goggles with small holes in them to see whatever he studying and to wearing earmuffs to minimize distractions That s dedication


  8. ☘Misericordia☘ ~ The Serendipity Aegis ~ ⚡ϟ⚡ϟ⚡⛈ ✺❂❤❣ ☘Misericordia☘ ~ The Serendipity Aegis ~ ⚡ϟ⚡ϟ⚡⛈ ✺❂❤❣ says:

    Deliberate cognitive practice Sounds just like Hank Moody s motto Constant vigilance Q The brain best remembers things that are repeated, rhythmic, rhyming, structured, and above all easily visualized c Q Monotony collapses time novelty unfolds it You can exercise daily and eat healthily and live a long life, while experiencing a short one If you spend your life sitting in a cubicle and passing papers, one day is bound to blend unmemorably into the next and disappear That s why it s Deliberate cognitive practice Sounds just like Hank Moody s motto Constant vigilance Q The brain best remembers things that are repeated, rhythmic, rhyming, structured, and above all easily visualized c Q Monotony collapses time novelty unfolds it You can exercise daily and eat healthily and live a long life, while experiencing a short one If you spend your life sitting in a cubicle and passing papers, one day is bound to blend unmemorably into the next and disappear That s why it s so important to change routines regularly, and take vacations to exotic locales, and have as many new experiences as possible that can serve to anchor our memories Creating new memories stretches out psychological time, and lengthens our perception of our lives c Q Thewe remember, the better we are at processing the world And the better we are at processing the world, thewe can remember about it c Q There are no limits There are plateaus, but you must not stay there, you must go beyond them If it kills you, it kills you c Q Psychologists have discovered that the most efficient method is to force yourself to type 10 to 20 percent faster than your comfort pace and to allow yourself to make mistakes Only by watching yourself mistype at that faster speed can you figure out the obstacles that are slowing you down and overcome them By bringing typing out of the autonomous stage and back under conscious control, it is possible to conquer the OK plateau c Q When the point of reading is, as it was for Peter of Ravenna, remembering, you approach a text very differently than most of us do today Now we put a premium on reading quickly and widely, and that breeds a kind of superficiality in our reading, and in what we seek to get out of books You can t read a page a minute, the rate at which you re probably reading this book, and expect to remember what you ve read for any considerable length of time If something is going to be made memorable, it has to be dwelled upon, repeated c Q Amateur musicians, for example, arelikely to spend their practice time playing music, whereas pros arelikely to work through tedious exercises or focus on specific, difficult parts of pieces c Q The brain is like a muscle, he said, and memory training is a form of mental workout Over time, like any form of exercise, it ll make the brain fitter, quicker, andnimble It s an idea that dates back to the very origins of memory training Roman orators argued that the art of memory the proper retention and ordering of knowledge was a vital instrument for the invention of new ideas c


  9. Oriana Oriana says:

    Well, I m not going to lie, this book has already got two strikes I basically hate the genre of I did this wacky thing for a year, and then I wrote a book about it , plus he is the brother of a famouser writer whom Ior less revile But OMG you guys, my memory is so laughably bad And apparently this book might possibly have a side effect of helping me improve that, which would be worth slogging through a middling memoir Here s another book I m sad I never found time to review It wa Well, I m not going to lie, this book has already got two strikes I basically hate the genre of I did this wacky thing for a year, and then I wrote a book about it , plus he is the brother of a famouser writer whom Ior less revile But OMG you guys, my memory is so laughably bad And apparently this book might possibly have a side effect of helping me improve that, which would be worth slogging through a middling memoir Here s another book I m sad I never found time to review It was a great case of proving my open mindedness ha although I went in very ready to hate, I was totally charmed by this Moonwalking is a strange window into a very strange world if you didn t know there was a competitive memory circuit, you re in for some fun and some bemused head shaking It s actually also a very good use of the I did this wacky thing for a year, and then I wrote a book about it genre, because it s fascinating to watch Joshua completely embrace a new hobby and get totally embroiled in it, but I m glad he then extricated and went back to presumably his normal life I d like to say other things about this book, like to tell you about the very fascinating people you ll meet herein, and the unbelievably intricate lengths people go to to build their competitive memory chops, such as constructing memory palaces completely populated with bizarre statuary and bric a brac, which is assigned excruciatingly specific meaning that corresponds to the thing you re trying to remember but look, I read this book over a year ago, and I didn t actually do any of those memory training exercises, even while I was reading, and so nope Nothing muchwas retained.It s a great book, though


  10. Angie Angie says:

    Joshua Foer begins exploring memory at the US Memory Competition, where he watches people who claim to have normal memory capacity memorize lists of phone numbers, the order of decks of cards, and poems in mere minutes Intrigued, he eventually decides to compete in the competition himself and receives help from leaders in memory techniques along the way.Foer weaves his experience in memory training with research and a history of the practice With a casual, story telling style he takes you on a Joshua Foer begins exploring memory at the US Memory Competition, where he watches people who claim to have normal memory capacity memorize lists of phone numbers, the order of decks of cards, and poems in mere minutes Intrigued, he eventually decides to compete in the competition himself and receives help from leaders in memory techniques along the way.Foer weaves his experience in memory training with research and a history of the practice With a casual, story telling style he takes you on a meandering but fascinating journey I enjoyed that he was able to take himself seriously while also poking some fun at himself and his memory competitors While he begins as an outsider looking in, by the end, he really seemed to become a part of this eclectic community.I came to this book curious to know how I could improve my own unreliable memory Foer does make a serious case that most people who dedicate themselves to learning memory techniques could learn how to do some pretty awesome party tricks However, once I learned what that dedication required, I lost interest in doing any sort of serious memory training.However, I think this book makes a strong point that beingaware of what we re taking in, and finding ways to record it on our external memory devices like computers and notebooks, can improve our own creative output I found it an interesting commentary on what we may have lost along the way as we have gainedways to store and record information


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