The Divine Milieu Epub ´ The Divine ePUB ↠

The Divine Milieu Epub ´ The Divine ePUB ↠

The Divine Milieu [Ebook] ➩ The Divine Milieu ➯ Pierre Teilhard de Chardin – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk The essential companion to Pierre Teilhard de Chardin s The Phenomenom of Man, The Divine Milieu expands on the spiritual message so basic to his thought He shows how man s spiritual life can become a The essential companion to Pierre Teilhard de Chardin s The Phenomenom of Man, The Divine Milieu expands on the spiritual message so basic to his thought He shows how man s spiritual life can become a participation in the destiny of the universeTeilhard de Chardin geologist, priest, and major voice in twentieth century Christianity probes the ultimate meaning of all physical exploration and the fruit of The Divine ePUB ↠ his own inner life The Divine Milieu is a spiritual treasure for every religion bookshelf.


10 thoughts on “The Divine Milieu

  1. Yaholo Yaholo says:

    This book is truly close to my heart It bridges the gap between the best wisdom of mysticism regarding the personal spirit to apply these concepts to our collective spirit So often mysticism in an introverted discipline, focusing on the interior life The Divine Milieu is a beautiful vision of what Christian Mysticism could look like on the level of a church, a community, and a civilization I wishpastors and church leaders read this book


  2. Bob Couchenour Bob Couchenour says:

    I was first introduced to the writings of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin while I was living on the streets of Austin Texas, homeless, by another homeless individual by the name of Charlie Charlie was an intellectual and obviously had some of the same interest as me, primarily the world, the nature of reality , Society culture, and surviving in the midst of what was seemingly an alien and hostile environment We would see Charlie at least once a month at a local Presbyterian Church which offered I was first introduced to the writings of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin while I was living on the streets of Austin Texas, homeless, by another homeless individual by the name of Charlie Charlie was an intellectual and obviously had some of the same interest as me, primarily the world, the nature of reality , Society culture, and surviving in the midst of what was seemingly an alien and hostile environment We would see Charlie at least once a month at a local Presbyterian Church which offered breakfast, a place to rest and fellowship, and much needed resources In the span of time we began sharing the same table with Charlie and often found ourselves in conversation During one of these conversations Charlie showed me a book he was reading it was entitled the Phenomenon of Man by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin.Our regular spot to hang out was the library, you could find many of the homeless here In many ways you could say the library became our home away from home and there really wasn t a much better place to be We would either find ourselves spending time on the computers or on another floor devouring some books It was here that I found a copy of the phenomenon of man and began reading During my time I was only able to finish half of the book and will find it and continue will begin again from the beginning, as I was intrigued but many of de Chardins ideas At my first reading of de Chardin I did not realize who he was or what he was but his ideas were definitely interesting at the least and they still intrigue me enough to finish the book It is only recently but I have come to knowabout de Chardin I am a bit surprised that he could be both a scientist and a Catholic priest and still hold to what he expresses in his writing There is obviously some things I still need to learn concerning a man s ability and desire to try and retain a loyalty to an old order which is so contradictory to what the evidence isNotwithstanding what de Chardin expresses was well worth considering, giving requisite thought and possibly allowing greater influence, as there are things some can see and comprehend which others because of our predispositions would rather not considerWhere I was considerably impressed with the Phenomenon of Man I have found this volume The Divine Milieu far less interesting and engaging Of course if one is already predisposed to believe in God as traditionally understood by the Church much may be gleaned And there s a certain mystical bent, which is purely Pierre Teilhard de Chardins de Chardin, but it seems the primary purpose is to substantiate own religious faith in relation to Catholic tradition IE if one is already predisposed to accept the existence of God as defined by the church you may enjoy this But I personally found it to be a step back from his other workAs a matter of psychological health CG Jung people have a tendency to adopt and attach ourselves to various Myths, each filling out the need of our conscious minds to complete and make sense of the world we inhabit We need to understand what a myth is.sAmericans we live under the illusion of certain myths First there is the myth of the so called American dream We cling to this myth because for many of us it seems to hold true unfortunately we tend to neglect the ones for whom it does not work Then there is the myth of Manifest Destiny This myth declares that from the founding of this nation we were a city set on a hill and it was our right to extend our borders across the continent from sea to shining sea regardless of prior claims by others inhabiting the land we desired to possess This idea of manifest destiny was of a biblical nature and we still adhere to it under the guise of spreading democracy But it is a collective myth It is not real except that it is an ideal that most of us Americans have been sold and bought into that is something which we claim as divine right De Chardin s presentation in this book is littlethan an assumed support of the Catholic myth shrouded in an air of mysticism About 25 years ago I was drawn to the writing of a professor of apologetics at Westminster theological seminary, Cornelius Van Til One of his primary writings was a book entitled Defense of the Faith I am not here to criticize Van Til As I found it at the time I would consider it a work of genius, albeit a Reformed religious genius But you cannot deny the man was brilliant If I were to re title this book I would call it Defense of the Myth Though I respect de Chardin for his intelligence and mind I cannot help but consider this worka defense of his Catholicism then of real academic inquiry We all do what we need to, too secure ourselves


  3. Paul Dubuc Paul Dubuc says:

    Very interesting author and ideas A good translation with a biographical introduction I thought the author s ideas on the meaning of death were profound, thought provoking and inspiring Inspiring also were the italicized prayers at the end of some of the sections Some of his other ideas in the book were not so interesting, but still worth considering Lots of Latin phrases sprinkled throughout which were lost on me I enjoyed reading the book it was well worth the time spent.


  4. Sue Sue says:

    I LOVE this book and this man Loved it so much I m now writing my dissertation on it and the author So, it has indeed greatly influenced the way I think and talk about my Christian faith, and how I teach it also Not an easy read it s NOT spiritual fluff but I highly recommend


  5. Deborah Deborah says:

    Teilhard presents complicated science and metaphysics, and it s fascinating So fascinating that I can t believe that he s not a household name His theories are reminscent of ideas presented by Paul Davies and Rupert Sheldrake I suppose that someday science will catch up with religion


  6. Timothy Ball Timothy Ball says:

    Just as, at the centre of the divine milieu, all the sounds of created being are fused, without being confused, in a single note which dominates and sustains them, so all the powers of the soul begin to resound in response to its call and these multiple tones, in their turn, compose themselves into a single, ineffably simple vibration in which all the spiritual nuances of love and of the intellect, of zeal and of tranquillity, of fullness and of ecstasy, of passion and of indifference, of a Just as, at the centre of the divine milieu, all the sounds of created being are fused, without being confused, in a single note which dominates and sustains them, so all the powers of the soul begin to resound in response to its call and these multiple tones, in their turn, compose themselves into a single, ineffably simple vibration in which all the spiritual nuances of love and of the intellect, of zeal and of tranquillity, of fullness and of ecstasy, of passion and of indifference, of assimilation and of surrender, of rest and of motion are born and pass and shine forth, according to the times and the circum stances, like the countless possibilities of an inward attitude, inexpressible and unique


  7. Zach Zach says:

    What is most divine in God is that, in an absolute sense, we are nothing apart from him 49 No one lifts his little finger to do the smallest task unless moved, however obscurely, by the conviction that he is contributing infinitesimally as least indirectly to the building of something definitive that is to say, to your work, my God 56 At the heart of our universe, each soul exists for God, in the Lord But in all reality, even material reality, around each one of us, exists for our What is most divine in God is that, in an absolute sense, we are nothing apart from him 49 No one lifts his little finger to do the smallest task unless moved, however obscurely, by the conviction that he is contributing infinitesimally as least indirectly to the building of something definitive that is to say, to your work, my God 56 At the heart of our universe, each soul exists for God, in the Lord But in all reality, even material reality, around each one of us, exists for our souls Hence, all sensible reality, around each one of us, exists, through our souls, for God in our Lord 56 Any increase I can bring upon myself or upon things is translated into some increase in my power to love and some progress in Christ s blessed hold upon the universe 63 God, in all that is most living an incarnate in him, is not far away from us, altogether apart from the world we see, touch, hear, smell and taste about us Rather, he awaits us every instant in our action, in the work of the moment There is a sense in which he is at the tip of my pen, my spade, my brush, my needle of my heart and my thought 64 Nothing here below is profane for those who know how to see On the contrary, everything is sacred for the men who can distinguish that portion of chosen being which is subject to Christ s drawing power in the process of consummation Try, with God s help, to perceive the connection even physical and natural which binds your labour with the building of the kingdom of heaven try to realize that heaven itself smiles upon you and, through your works, draws you to itself then, as you leave church for the noisy streets, you will remain with only one feeling, that of continuing to immerse yourself in God 66 Never, at any time, whether eating or drinking , consent to do anything without first of all realizing its significance and constructive value in Christo Jesu, and pursuing it with all your might 66 O God, whose call precedes the very first of our movements, grant me the desire to desire being that, by means of that divine thirst which is your gift, the access to the great waters may open wide within me 79 Teach me to treat my death as an act of communion 90 Your essential duty and desire is to be united with God But in order to be united, you must first of all be be yourself as completely as possible 96 By means of all created things, without exception, the divine assails us, penetrates us and moulds us 112 Let us leave the surface, and, without leaving the world, plunge into God There, and from there, in him and through him, we shall hold all things and have command of all things 115 The human layer of the earth is wholly and continually under the organizing influx of the incarnate Christ 124 The Eucharist must invade my life My life must become, as a result of the sacrament, an unlimited and endless contact with you that life which seemed, a few moments ago, like baptism with you in the waters of the world, now reveals itself to me as communion with you through the world It is the sacrament of life The sacrament of my life of my life received, of my life lived, of my life surrendered 127 The kingdom of God is within us When Christ appears in the clouds he will simply be manifesting a metamorphosis that has been slowly accomplished under his influence in the heart of the mass of humankind 128 God tends, by the logic of his creative effort, to make himself sought and perceived by us But in the end the initiative, the awakening, always comes from him 131 In a real sense only one man will be saved Christ, the head and living summary of humanity Each one of the elect is called to see God face to face But his act of vision will be vitally inseparable from the elevating and illuminating action of Christ In heaven we ourselves shall contemplate God, but, as it were, through the eyes of Christ 143 Christian charity, which is preached so fervently by the Gospels, is nothing else than theof less conscious cohesion of souls engendered by their communal convergence in Christo Jesu It is impossible to love Christ without loving others And it is impossible to love others without moving nearer to Christ 144 The man with a passionate sense of the diving milieu cannot bear to find things about him obscure, tepid and empty which should be full and vibrant with God He is paralysed by the thought of the numberless spirits which are linked to his in the unity of the same world, but are not yet fully kindled by the flame of the divine presence 144 I confess, my God, that I have long been, and even now am, recalcitrant to the love of my neighbor Grant that I may see you, even and above all, in the souls of my brothers, at their most personal, and most true, and most distant 145 Humanity was sleeping it is still sleeping imprisoned in the narrow joys of its little closed loves A tremendous spiritual power is slumbering in the depths of our multitude, which will manifest itself only when we have learnt to break down the barriers of our egoisms and, by a fundamental recasting of our outlook, raise ourselves up to the habitual and practical vision of universal realities 146 The history of the kingdom of God is, directly, one of a reunion The total divine milieu is formed by the incorporation of every elected spirit in Jesus Christ 146


  8. Joyce Joyce says:

    I think I got the gist of the book But for me, it was difficult to read in that the sentences were usually a paragraph long, with big words and Latin references I d read and then not be sure I understood what was being said My comments are a reflection on me, not smart enough, not the book.


  9. Lesley Arrowsmith Lesley Arrowsmith says:

    I have to admit that I picked this book up as a result of reading Julian May s Galactic Milieu novels She mentions Teilhard de Chardin, and I was intrigued It s a fascinating read and you can see why the Roman Catholic church were a little bit wary of his ideas Put together with the Julian May stories, though, it all makes a lot of sense, and I went on to read The Phenomenon of Man and other books by him Hard going, but very much worth while.Oh, and he was an archaeologist working in China I have to admit that I picked this book up as a result of reading Julian May s Galactic Milieu novels She mentions Teilhard de Chardin, and I was intrigued It s a fascinating read and you can see why the Roman Catholic church were a little bit wary of his ideas Put together with the Julian May stories, though, it all makes a lot of sense, and I went on to read The Phenomenon of Man and other books by him Hard going, but very much worth while.Oh, and he was an archaeologist working in China on fossils, and he lived through terrible things in the First World War, and it all shaped his theological ideas I like my theology mystical and a bit unconventional that s why I love Mother Julian of Norwich, and Kathleen Norris too


  10. McMaeve McMaeve says:

    Although PT de Chardin would disagree with my analysis, I think this is a marriage between paganism and Christianity, in my very lay understanding of this text Rich with devotion to the divine, in all its presentations I could certainly read this again, especially if I had a reading buddy who could help me decipher the Christian references that are a bit lost on me


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