The Way of the Sufi PDF/EPUB ß of the Epub µ

The Way of the Sufi PDF/EPUB ß of the Epub µ

The Way of the Sufi ❮Reading❯ ➶ The Way of the Sufi Author Idries Shah – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk In this wide ranging anthology of Sufi writings, Idries Shah, who was one of Sufism s leading exponents, offers a broad selection of poetry, contemplations, letters, lectures, and teaching stories tha In this wide ranging of the Epub µ anthology of Sufi writings, Idries Shah, who was one of Sufism s leading exponents, offers a broad selection of poetry, contemplations, letters, lectures, and teaching stories that together form an illuminating introduction to this unique body of thought Sufism, the mystical aspect of Islam, has had a dynamic and lasting effect on the literature of that religion Its teachings, often elusive and subtle, aim at the perfecting and completing of the human mind In The Way Epub / contrast to certain other beliefs and philosophies, Sufism is continually evolving and progressing and is consequently always relevant to the contemporary world His work is as exciting as a good novel The Times Literary Supplement.


About the Author: Idries Shah

Idries Shah Persian , of the Epub µ also known as Idris Shah, n Sayed Idries el Hashimi Arabic , was an author and teacher in the Sufi tradition who wrote over three dozen critically acclaimed books on topics ranging from psychology and spirituality to travelogues and culture studiesBorn in India, the descendant of a family of Afghan nobles, Shah grew up mainly in England His early writings centred on magic and witchcraft In he established a publishing house, Octagon Press, The Way Epub / producing translations of Sufi classics as well as titles of his own His most seminal work was The Sufis, which appeared in and was well received internationally In , Shah founded the Institute for Cultural Research, a London based educational charity devoted to the study of human behaviour and culture A similar organisation, the Institute for the Study of Human Knowledge ISHK , exists in the United States, under the directorship of Stanford University psychology professor Robert Ornstein, Way of the PDF È whom Shah appointed as his deputy in the USIn his writings, Shah presented Sufism as a universal form of wisdom that predated Islam Emphasising that Sufism was not static but always adapted itself to the current time, place and people, he framed his teaching in Western psychological terms Shah made extensive use of traditional teaching stories and parables, texts that contained multiple layers of meaning designed to trigger insight and self reflection in the reader He is perhaps best known for his collections of humorous Mulla Nasrudin storiesShah was at times criticised by orientalists who questioned his credentials and background His role in the controversy surrounding a new translation of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, published by his friend Robert Graves and his older brother Omar Ali Shah, came in for particular scrutiny However, he also had many notable defenders, chief among them the novelist Doris Lessing Shah came to be recognised as a spokesman for Sufism in the West and lectured as a visiting professor at a number of Western universities His works have played a significant part in presenting Sufism as a secular, individualistic form of spiritual wisdomIdries Shah s books on Sufism achieved considerable critical acclaim He was the subject of a BBC documentary One Pair of Eyes in , and two of his works The Way of the Sufi and Reflections were chosen as Outstanding Book of the Year by the BBC s The Critics programme Among other honours, Shah won six first prizes at the UNESCO World Book Year in , and the Islamic scholar James Kritzeck, commenting on Shah s Tales of the Dervishes, said that it was beautifully translatedThe reception of Shah s movement was also marked by much controversy Some orientalists were hostile, in part because Shah presented classical Sufi writings as tools for self development to be used by contemporary people, rather than as objects of historical study L P Elwell Sutton from Edinburgh University, Shah s fiercest critic, described his books as trivial , replete with errors of fact, slovenly and inaccurate translations and even misspellings of Oriental names and words a muddle of platitudes, irrelevancies and plain mumbo jumbo , adding for good measure that Shah had a remarkable opinion of his own importance Expressing amusement and amazement at the sycophantic manner of Shah s interlocutors in a BBC radio interview, Elwell Sutton concluded that some Western intellectuals were so desperate to find answers to the questions that baffle them, that, confronted with wisdom from the mysterious East, they abandon their critical faculties and submit to brainwashing of the crudest kind To Elwell Sutton, Shah s Sufism belonged to the realm of Pseudo Sufism , centred not on God but on man Doris Lessing, one of Shah s greatest defenders,stated in a interview I found Sufism as taught by Idries Shah, which claim.



10 thoughts on “The Way of the Sufi

  1. Omar Tlich Omar Tlich says:

    A good book to start reading about Sufism However, I expected adocumentary type of writing The book is so full of quotes and anecdotes of famous Sufi sheikhs most of the book There is a great emphasis on how the methods of teaching change from one era to another, and one place to another The Sufi Sheikh is supposed to know exactly what the student needs and direct him to the right way This topic is perhaps the most recurrent one.I wished to knowabout Sufism by delving into t A good book to start reading about Sufism However, I expected adocumentary type of writing The book is so full of quotes and anecdotes of famous Sufi sheikhs most of the book There is a great emphasis on how the methods of teaching change from one era to another, and one place to another The Sufi Sheikh is supposed to know exactly what the student needs and direct him to the right way This topic is perhaps the most recurrent one.I wished to knowabout Sufism by delving into the main teachings of some orders, the lives of famous Sheikhs Al Ghazali, Ibn Arabi particularly I ll see if I find this in his other books.Really enjoyed reading this though


  2. Kevan Bowkett Kevan Bowkett says:

    This text was called a key book by Doris Lessing Written by traveller and authority on the Sufis, Idries Shah, the volume contains a great variety of material concerning the people called the Sufis, what they study, and how and why The collection includes essays, tales, jokes, themes for contemplation, statements by masters, poetry, information on Four Major Orders of Sufism and on classical teachers such as Rumi, Ghazali, Saadi, and Omar Khayyam in its variety the book seemslike Mi This text was called a key book by Doris Lessing Written by traveller and authority on the Sufis, Idries Shah, the volume contains a great variety of material concerning the people called the Sufis, what they study, and how and why The collection includes essays, tales, jokes, themes for contemplation, statements by masters, poetry, information on Four Major Orders of Sufism and on classical teachers such as Rumi, Ghazali, Saadi, and Omar Khayyam in its variety the book seemslike Middle Eastern works such as The Thousand and One Nights, or Jami s Abode of Spring or even the Bible than it is like familiar Western genres The book serves as a splendid introduction to Sufi thought and practice and the introductory essay, The Study of Sufism in the West, which helps orient the seeker with respect to contemporary Sufism, is alone worth the cost of the volume , and gives the inquirer many matters for thought and reflection One high point, in a book filled with very many highlights, is the poem of ibn al Arabi called The Special Love, which seems to convey something of the essence of what the Sufis seek One valuable message of the book seems to be that the Sufis seek what is sometimes called the Truth, or Reality, out of love for it, for its own sake, not due to ordinary personality needs extended into this area Rabia is quoted on this O Lord If I worship you from fear of hell, cast me into hell If I worship you from desire for paradise, deny me paradise


  3. John Zada John Zada says:

    This book is a superb compendium of traditional tales, poetry and sayings from individual Sufis and Sufi schools over the last millennia The introduction by its compiler, the late Anglo Afghan author and experiential philosopher, Idries Shah, may be one of the most accurate and comprehensive short articles defining Sufism that exists anywhere Pages upon pages of anecdotes bursting with layers of wisdom and involving a mish mash of characters from Morocco to Indonesia will reward a conscien This book is a superb compendium of traditional tales, poetry and sayings from individual Sufis and Sufi schools over the last millennia The introduction by its compiler, the late Anglo Afghan author and experiential philosopher, Idries Shah, may be one of the most accurate and comprehensive short articles defining Sufism that exists anywhere Pages upon pages of anecdotes bursting with layers of wisdom and involving a mish mash of characters from Morocco to Indonesia will reward a conscientious reader with a great dealthan the sum of its parts An interconnecting matrix of materials that is encyclopedic in scope


  4. Annie Annie says:

    This book is a great source of information and history on Sufism A scholarly work, published first in 1970, it is still pertinent to today.It opens with an important chapter on the study of Sufism in the Western world and its limitations.Shah raises questions about how much one can learn and understand about Sufism, using books and writings which may not fully understand how Sufism works As one example, he uses modern Western debates on the meaning of the word Sufi Westerners, with our d This book is a great source of information and history on Sufism A scholarly work, published first in 1970, it is still pertinent to today.It opens with an important chapter on the study of Sufism in the Western world and its limitations.Shah raises questions about how much one can learn and understand about Sufism, using books and writings which may not fully understand how Sufism works As one example, he uses modern Western debates on the meaning of the word Sufi Westerners, with our determination that there is an understandable and intellectual explanation for everything, often cannot accept that there may not be a logical explanatin.As explained in the eleventh century Revelation, the earliest Persian writings on Sufism by Hujwiri, the term Sufi has no etymology.But for decades, a common explanation by Westerners is that Sufi is similar to the Arabic word pronounced soof which means wool Those practicing Sufism wore wool, therefore this is the logical explanation Shah submits that the reason common among Sufis is that the effects of sounds are important in Sufism and the sound of the Arabic letters which bring out the sounds of S U F are significant to the Sufis in their practices.This short chapter is full of useful thoughts for modern day Western Sufis , with cautions and thoughts about what Sufism is, how it is understood and muchHe ends the chapter with a list of requirements for Western students studying Sufism 1 Understand the bulk of translations available are unsuitable 2 seek authorative written and oral information and activities designed by Sufis to operate in the student s own culture and times3 Recognize organizations not genuinely Sufi are conditioning instruments whether consciously or otherwise4 be prepared to abandon preconceptions about what it means to study 5 decide whether the student s search is or is not a disguised search for social integration, a manifestation of sheer curiosity, a desire for emotionial stimulus or statisfactin 6 credit the possibility that there is a conscious, efficient, deliberate source of legitimate Sufic teaching in the West These seem to be true and good questions for any Seeker to ask, of any religious practice This is all in the first chapter, andworth the price of the book just to read that section But, there is of course, muchShah states the intent of this book is to give geeral reader an idea of the richness and variety of Sufi ideas, and the rest of the writings have been formed as an introduction to Westerners in the mid 20th century, when the book was written.Next is a section on Classic Authors with quotes and short biographical historical philosophical information about these authors Twelfth century philosopher El Ghazali, Omar Khayyam, Attar of Nishapar, Ibn El Arabi, Saadi of Shiraz, Hakim Jami, Hakim Sanai, Jalaludin Rumi are touched on.The next section is Four Major Orders, with short explanations of 1 The Chishti Order 2 The Qardi Order 3 The Suhrawardi Order and 4 The Naqshbandi Order.There are also stories of Sufi Masters, teaching stories, themes for solitary contemplation, group recitals and letters and lectures very short, at the end.My Turkish daughter in law when introduced to American Sufis in our Quaker meeting looked puzzled they did not seem closely related to the Sufis she is familiar with This book may explain why


  5. Ita Ita says:

    Eight centuries after El Ghazali wrote about it, Ivan Pavlov announced the results of his experiments on dogs, and was credited with the discovery of conditioning Ghazali a Sufi s work even exceeds contemporary knowledge, according to Idries Shah He is one of a number of scientists and writers of astounding achievement, who depended for their accomplishments, not on the scientific method as we know it, or even on the intellect, but on the Sufi Way Man is made for learning, wrote El Ghaz Eight centuries after El Ghazali wrote about it, Ivan Pavlov announced the results of his experiments on dogs, and was credited with the discovery of conditioning Ghazali a Sufi s work even exceeds contemporary knowledge, according to Idries Shah He is one of a number of scientists and writers of astounding achievement, who depended for their accomplishments, not on the scientific method as we know it, or even on the intellect, but on the Sufi Way Man is made for learning, wrote El Ghazali The educational system which allowed him to develop involves the whole person Another Sufi, Baba Tahir Uryan, referred to it as the Celestial Science Others saw it as the Science of Man, and the Science of Knowledge The dying words of Mansur al Hallaj, who accepted stoning rather than abandon it, were, I recommend you to seek something of which the smallest part is worththan all goodness the Knowledge of what is true true science.Sufi writers produced, and still produce, work considered impossible by our experts in literature In the 13th century, Saadi of Shiraz spent most of his time as a wanderer, but succeeded in writing two great classics within three years These books contain the whole range of the deepest Sufi knowledge which can be put in writing, the different layers interwoven to produce a seamless whole Hakim Sanai was the author of The Walled Garden of Truth, in which there are several passages that can be read inthan one way Shah tells us how this effects a shift in the perceptions which is analogous to a change of focus on one and the same object Work of this calibre was possible because the Sufis had developed techniques for raising human consciousness They employed the enlightened use of music, and became expert in the induction of spiritual states Shah stresses that techniques such as these must be used within the context of the development of the whole person, under the guidance of one who has travelled the entire Sufi Way Teachers should be studied, is the advice offered by Musa Kazim In Part Four of this book, Among the Masters, we are shown, through the words, and records of the actions of numerous Sufis, how teachers, each one unique but conscious of a Unity, perform their function My duty, wrote Ibn el Arabi, one of the great Sufis of the Middle Ages, is the debt of love Study materials are found in the last one hundred pages of this most enjoyable book They include letters and lectures, contemplation themes, and fifteen timeless, and priceless, teaching stories


  6. Ulrika Eriksson Ulrika Eriksson says:

    It is easy to get lost in the jungle of texts that exists about Sufism and some doesn t represent Sufismthan snake handling represents Christianity or Bingo represents Mathematics writes the author His book is meant to be an appropriate introduction with material specially chosen to be actual and suitable for our time and he wants to show the vastness and richness of Sufi ideas through the ages.Sufism invites man to push forward his own evolution It is a metaphysical system intermeshed It is easy to get lost in the jungle of texts that exists about Sufism and some doesn t represent Sufismthan snake handling represents Christianity or Bingo represents Mathematics writes the author His book is meant to be an appropriate introduction with material specially chosen to be actual and suitable for our time and he wants to show the vastness and richness of Sufi ideas through the ages.Sufism invites man to push forward his own evolution It is a metaphysical system intermeshed in ordinary life that has always been here and it is equivalent to the Hermetic, Pythagorean and Platonic streams There are manydefinitions in the book, as well as material for contemplation and reflection, sufficient for a life time Shah takes up problems with studies of Sufism, presents different Teachers and their methods, problems typical for our time like indoctrination, institutionalization and the mixing of opinions and facts The Sufi and scholar El Ghazzali wrote, 800 years before Pavlov, about indoctrination something most of us nowadays are prone to be especially because we are so ill informed about the phenomena and it s power, in spite of lots of research done To be able to escape it we must be able to identify it In The Way of the Sufis as in his other books there is an underlying urging to familiarize oneself with the knowledge we actually have and start using it The book was first published 1968 by Octagon Press Ltd and I read it again now during ISF Publishing s, ongoing republishing of the whole of Idries Shah s corpus I recommend it to all seekers of meaning of life apart from happiness It is outstanding, I think as well as BBC s The Critic s did in 1968 when they chose it as outstanding book of the year


  7. Dan Sperling Dan Sperling says:

    Most people know little or nothing about Sufism, and what they may have heard about it here and there is likely to be erroneous In THE WAY OF THE SUFI, Idries Shah does an excellent job of cutting straight to the chase to give the reader an unclouded glimpse of what Sufism really is The result is a book that s both eye opening and fascinating Reading it, one learns that Sufism is working towards a practical goal rather than propagating empty theory, and that the materials it makes use of must Most people know little or nothing about Sufism, and what they may have heard about it here and there is likely to be erroneous In THE WAY OF THE SUFI, Idries Shah does an excellent job of cutting straight to the chase to give the reader an unclouded glimpse of what Sufism really is The result is a book that s both eye opening and fascinating Reading it, one learns that Sufism is working towards a practical goal rather than propagating empty theory, and that the materials it makes use of must be carefully tailored to the target audience as well as to the times That s why, as Shah puts it in the introduction, THE WAY OF THE SUFI is designed to present Sufi ideas, actions and report not for the microscope or as museum pieces, but in their relevance to a current community what we call the contemporary world


  8. Mishko Papic Mishko Papic says:

    The Way of the Sufi might be an ideal introductory book to the present day Sufism.It is a relatively small book but covers a fair amount of ground The way of the Sufi is a book about learning how to approach the Sufism, and in a way how not to.Book draws from the past, Islam, historical exemplars, world cultures, but it is modern, refashioned for contemporary situation and western mentality For somebody who is not much informed about the Shah s work, it might come as a surprise that stories, j The Way of the Sufi might be an ideal introductory book to the present day Sufism.It is a relatively small book but covers a fair amount of ground The way of the Sufi is a book about learning how to approach the Sufism, and in a way how not to.Book draws from the past, Islam, historical exemplars, world cultures, but it is modern, refashioned for contemporary situation and western mentality For somebody who is not much informed about the Shah s work, it might come as a surprise that stories, jokes and humour play a significant part That is not to say that material is not serious, but it is a multilayered process that allows almost any method to be used for the required result Stories scattered in this book and others of Shah s are like One Thousand and One Nights, they intersect and mix, mingle and might continue somewhere else in the material The most perplexing realization is that Sufism can be thought and probably is very often non verbally Art, music, literature, architecture, science, psychology, sociology, worldly affairs and domestic chores can be used as method or tools The book also makes clear that the kernel of the way is the teacher who is stabilizing and nurturing force behind the design So it could probably be called the way to the Sufi too.For best results approach the book with no expectations butlike a bread crumbs path Follow the stories It might lead to something or someone, or not


  9. Najlla Habibyar Najlla Habibyar says:

    I call it informative piece of literature Good to read.


  10. Cj Maddox Cj Maddox says:

    THE WAY OF THE SUFI contains examples of almost all the different literary formats used by Idries Shah to project Sufi teachings in the modern world Teaching stories, jokes and poems modern University lectures brief histories and selections from the Classical Authors and traditional Sufi Orders sayings, doings and teachings of the great Sufi Masters Solitary and Group Contemplation themes letters, talks and interviews and Question Answer sessions.You will find selections from people l THE WAY OF THE SUFI contains examples of almost all the different literary formats used by Idries Shah to project Sufi teachings in the modern world Teaching stories, jokes and poems modern University lectures brief histories and selections from the Classical Authors and traditional Sufi Orders sayings, doings and teachings of the great Sufi Masters Solitary and Group Contemplation themes letters, talks and interviews and Question Answer sessions.You will find selections from people like Rumi, Saadi, Khayyam, Hafiz, Hallaj, Ibn Arabi, Abdul Qadir Jilani, Bahaudin Naqshband, Junayd, al Ghazali, Ali, and the Prophet Muhammad, among many others There are even appearances by that inimitable holy fool, the Mulla Nasrudin.The result is a comprehensive effect made up of many small impacts which, in a non linear way, give an overall picture and deep impression of Sufi teaching Because of the way it s formatted, the book compresses an enormous amount of material which can be used for many years of study, contemplation, and inspiration into the size of an average book, and so it s not only efficient but economical It s also very entertaining, challenging and stimulating, showing the humor, creativity, richness and variety of Sufi teaching materials.Along with The Sufis and possibly Caravan of Dreams, this may be the best introduction to Shah s overall work in particular, and the Sufi flavor in general The opening lecture entitled The Study of Sufism in the West deals with how Sufi ideas have entered, influenced and or been distorted in Western culture over the centuries including the contemporary landscape and almost everyone will be able to recognize some of the different people, groups and patterns which Shah refers to Although controversial in some cases, this material is extremely important for understanding Shah s Sufi presentation The lecture was originally delivered at Sussex University and therefore also deals in very small part with the problems of scholastic and academic approaches to Sufi studies Although at first the average newcomer to the subject may not be particularly interested in some of these issues, they will find it useful if they have been, or will be, exposed to the vast field of Sufi scholarship.After the lecture, Shah explains the intention of the book This book is intended to illustrate for the general reader something of the richness and range of Sufi ideas Its materials have also been chosen and are presented as applicable to the people of the contemporary culture, offering an introductory course of study And in the Introduction he writes The Sufi sages, schools, writers, teachings, humour, mysticism, formulations are all connected with the social and psychological relevance of certain human ideas.Being a man of timelessness and placelessness , the Sufi brings his experience into operation within the culture, the country, the climate in which he is living.The study of Sufic activity in distant cultures alone is of value only to those working in the narrow field of scholasticism Considering Sufi activities as merely religious, literary or philosophical phenomena will produce only garbled renditions of the Sufi way To try to extract theory or system and to attempt the study of it in isolation is just as comparatively profitless.This book is designed to present Sufi ideas, actions and report not for the microscope or as museum pieces, but in their relevance to a current community what we call the contemporary world


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