Candide, and Other Romances. Translated by Richard

Candide, and Other Romances. Translated by Richard


10 thoughts on “Candide, and Other Romances. Translated by Richard Aldington, with an Introd. and Notes. Illustrated by Norman Tealby

  1. Anthony Vacca Anthony Vacca says:

    After dismissing Candide as something probably dumb for the better part of twelve years, I decided to finally read Voltaire s most famous work, thanks to the prodding of fellow GR er Nathan N.R Gaddis , who in turn gets all his best ideas from Steven Moore, such as choosing this English translation as opposed to all the others In any case, I m happy to report that Roger Pearson s translation of Candide is the cat s pyjamas Never has rape, mutilation, murder, amputations, public burnings an After dismissing Candide as something probably dumb for the better part of twelve years, I decided to finally read Voltaire s most famous work, thanks to the prodding of fellow GR er Nathan N.R Gaddis , who in turn gets all his best ideas from Steven Moore, such as choosing this English translation as opposed to all the others In any case, I m happy to report that Roger Pearson s translation of Candide is the cat s pyjamas Never has rape, mutilation, murder, amputations, public burnings and cannibalism been as funny as this Voltaire s masterpiece is a piss take on optimism as a branch of philosophy, but it still works outside of that context dressed up as a picaresque bildungsroman, staring Candide, the haplessly na ve misfortunate who is jostled ceaselessly about by political carnage, religious cruelty and natural disasters, as he tries to reunite with the love his life Weighing in at under a hundred pages, this novella is a satirical gem of 18th century Enlightened Literature.The other pieces packed into this collection are fun philosophical tales, but none are as rambunctiously readable as the aforementioned star of the show Micromegas uses the Rabelaisian comedic device of giants to make a brief report regarding an interplanetary visit to Earth from a pair of ginormous as fuck scholars and the debate on the silliness of metaphysics that followed Zandig offers some Oriental spice with another coming of age story about its titular hero making a journey from humble beginnings to kingly rewards, all the while maintaining his unerring rationalism and morality The Ingenu is yet another coming of age story, but this time in the classic Babe Pig in the City mode A brave no nonsense Indian don t worry, it is quickly revealed that he is a full blooded European orphan, phew is shipped over to France and becomes involved in a hand wringing romantic potboiler that offers Voltaire ample opportunity to make a farce of empty headed religious s as well as makes use of his title character as a model for what our author saw as the ideal education, one that eschews stale philosophies, decrepit theologies, and all the other hang ups any given society is bound to try and stuff down our individual collective throats The rest of the collection tackles the power of tale telling with The White Bull and What Pleases the Lady The former is an absurdist blending of biblical parables and heathen fantasies that celebrates the power of telling tales the latter in a mind blowing display of translation as a game of telephone this is a translation of a translation that is turn being translated into English is a re telling of Chaucer s The Wife of Bath s Tale, that stays chastely faithful to its source material with only a few additions of some naughty verse and a friendly denouement about why we need to keep telling each other stories, damnit Don t know if I ll get around to readingVoltaire, but this collection makes for a nice introduction to the man and his philosophic tales that encapsulate his life long belief in rationality and self improvement on one s own terms


  2. Ana Ana says:

    Having already read Candide, Zadig and Micromegas, I skipped to the following What pleases the ladies a poem about a knight making a trip to Rome, makes a detour to Paris where a does harm to a pretty shop girl s eggs and virtue so is brought before the queen he is sentenced to hang unless he can gain pardon by finding what pleases all the fair view spoiler Whate er her qualities may be, Desires to bear both night and day O er all about her sovereign sway Woman would always fain comman Having already read Candide, Zadig and Micromegas, I skipped to the following What pleases the ladies a poem about a knight making a trip to Rome, makes a detour to Paris where a does harm to a pretty shop girl s eggs and virtue so is brought before the queen he is sentenced to hang unless he can gain pardon by finding what pleases all the fair view spoiler Whate er her qualities may be, Desires to bear both night and day O er all about her sovereign sway Woman would always fain command, If I lie, hang me out of hand hide spoiler 3 stars The Ing nu a ship of English merchants are come to France to trade bringing Ingenu, who was born of French parents but he does not know that until his aunt and uncle recognize him but raised as Huron Native American As he tries to integrate into French society satirizes religious doctrine, as well as the folly and injustices of French society 2 stars The white bull a satirical romance in which princess Amasidia, daughter of Amasis, King of Tanis in Egypt 2 stars


  3. Alan Alan says:

    Largely a critique of Leibnitz s 18C optimism, ours the best of all possible worlds, Candide the character brings earnest sincerity to his explorations They range from his teacher Pangloss s etiology of syphillis Paquette from an erudite Franciscan, who had it from an elderly countess, who had it from a Capt of cavalryall the way back to a Jesuit, who during his novitiate had it from a companion of Columbus Candide says, This is from the devil Which Pangloss, a student of Leibnitz, den Largely a critique of Leibnitz s 18C optimism, ours the best of all possible worlds, Candide the character brings earnest sincerity to his explorations They range from his teacher Pangloss s etiology of syphillis Paquette from an erudite Franciscan, who had it from an elderly countess, who had it from a Capt of cavalryall the way back to a Jesuit, who during his novitiate had it from a companion of Columbus Candide says, This is from the devil Which Pangloss, a student of Leibnitz, denies, If Columbus had not caught, on an American island, this sickness we should have had neither chocolate nor cochineal purple dye end of Ch.4 Candide to himself, If this is the best of all possible worlds, what are the others like end of Ch.6, and throughout Voltaire s irony here depends upon a regenerative circularity though Candide s love Cun gonde is raped and murdered, she reappears a few chapters later What also appears is steady anti semiticism which shocks a modern reader, but should not necessarily consign Voltaire to the trash heap Virtually all my friends since college are Jews, so I defer to their judgement here When Candide kills both Inquisitor and Jew, he laments the loss of his teacher Pangloss, If he had not been hanged, he would give us good advice in their hour of need Ch.9, start Instead, they turn to an old woman, whose rescuer informs her, I am from Naples, where they caponize two or three thousand children every year some die of it, others acquire a voicebeautiful than any woman s the opera castrati Ch.12, start Cacambo, who rescues them in Paraguay, reflects on cannibalism, Though we Europeans don t excercise our right to eat our neighbors, the reason is simply that we find it easy to get a good meal elsewhere but you don t have our resources, and we agree that it s certainly better to eat your enemies than to let the crow and vultures have the fruit of your victory Ch.16 Voltaire concudes this short work with Ch 30, the reunion of Candide and his mentors Pangloss and Cacombo and the old woman, as well as his mistress Cun gonde whose father the Baron they send away Another mentor, the Lutheran Martin, is firmly persuaded that things are just as bad wherever you go Ending in Turkey, they find a man ignorant of the news from Constantinople, who says, those who meddle in public business sometimes perish miserably, and they deserve their fate He offers his guests cream sherberts flavored with citron, lime, pistachio, and mocha coffee Candide assumes he must have enormous, splendid property No, twenty acres, which I cultivate with my children, and the work keeps us from three great evils, boredom, vice, and poverty Candide concludes, this venerable man seems to have found a fate preferable to the six kings with whom we have dined Pangloss lists the perils of great place Absalon was hung up by the hair and pierced with three darts you know how death came to Croesus, Pyrrhus, Perseus, Hannibal, JugurthaRich II of England, Henry Vi, Richard III, Mary Stuart, Charles I I know also, said Candide, that we must cultivate our garden See also my review of Voltaire s Dictionnaire Philosophique in French I cannot find my French Candide just now


  4. Zach Zach says:

    At seven stars for Candide, and three stars for the other nearly identical Voltaire works included in this book Ingenu, White Bull, Zadig and Micromegas , the average neatly comes out to a hearty five stars I m not sure if it s just the work of this translator, but the writing and biting sarcasm feels very modern perhaps Voltaire s antipathy is something people of any age can relate to The writing easily reaches out through the ages, giving a finger to the modern reader in a sarcastic voice At seven stars for Candide, and three stars for the other nearly identical Voltaire works included in this book Ingenu, White Bull, Zadig and Micromegas , the average neatly comes out to a hearty five stars I m not sure if it s just the work of this translator, but the writing and biting sarcasm feels very modern perhaps Voltaire s antipathy is something people of any age can relate to The writing easily reaches out through the ages, giving a finger to the modern reader in a sarcastic voice and farcical humor reminiscent of Woody Allen Can t recommend it highly enough


  5. John Maberry John Maberry says:

    I read this book while in college, in a Humanities class It moved and influenced me greatly as it came early on in my quest to come to grips with the disillusionment that my experiences in Vietnam caused me I found myself identifying with Candide For those of you old enough to remember Hubert Humphrey, he once referred to the Vietnam War as our great adventure and a wonderful one it is I imagined him as a latter day Pangloss Professor Pangloss had a ready perspective on life in this world I read this book while in college, in a Humanities class It moved and influenced me greatly as it came early on in my quest to come to grips with the disillusionment that my experiences in Vietnam caused me I found myself identifying with Candide For those of you old enough to remember Hubert Humphrey, he once referred to the Vietnam War as our great adventure and a wonderful one it is I imagined him as a latter day Pangloss Professor Pangloss had a ready perspective on life in this world everything is for the best in this best of all possible worlds If God created it, it must be wonderful Suffering It must be for the best how could it be otherwise Rape, robbery, torture all for the best After experiencing all manner of sufferings or viewing the suffering of others, Candide finds it difficult to accept Pangloss s optimism He hooks up with the pessimist Martin Eventually, Candide comes to realize that cause and effect in the world does exist Simple work, rather than idle philosophical speculation toiling in the garden, will yield the appropriate balance It presages my own eventual acceptance of the notion of karma a muchrational explanation of events in one s life, along with a means to make the best of them not by foolishly accepting them in Panglossian terms but taking control of one s own life If you didn t read it in college, read it now Voltaire makes contemporary satirists look like Pollyannas


  6. Adriane Devries Adriane Devries says:

    Candide is perhaps sixteenth century French philosopher Voltaire s most memorable work It is his anthem of a world view that challenges the na ve notion that all of man s troubled existence is the best of all possible worlds Voltaire moves his protagonist Candide through every conceivable trauma available in his time period enlistment in the army, beatings, shipwrecking, robbery, torture by the Inquisition, and separation from his beloved Cun gonde, for whom all his sufferings began expose Candide is perhaps sixteenth century French philosopher Voltaire s most memorable work It is his anthem of a world view that challenges the na ve notion that all of man s troubled existence is the best of all possible worlds Voltaire moves his protagonist Candide through every conceivable trauma available in his time period enlistment in the army, beatings, shipwrecking, robbery, torture by the Inquisition, and separation from his beloved Cun gonde, for whom all his sufferings began exposes humanity s corruption in government and religion and shows the futility in the pursuits of philosophy, science, and even romance Having plumbed the depths of worldy pleasures, fancy philosophies and fantastic quests, Candide ultimately resolves, like the writer of Ecclesiastes, that all is uniformly meaningless, and that we must therefore choose with resourceful intent to cultivate our garden amidst the detritus of life Let s work, then It is the only way to make life bearable Though pessimistic at its core, Candide was incredibly interesting, and often darkly amusing, as was the author s intent Here is a brilliant and satiric mind that lived hundreds of years ago that came to the same conclusion of the millennia we choose our mindset, and live and die upon it, either in joy or despair


  7. Lesle Lesle says:

    I was surprised, Candide is a short novel, but is jammed packed with adventures and devastation.The philosophy that was instilled on Candide who is down to earth is All things happen for good and There is no effect without a cause He joins the Bulgarian Army and from there life takes good from kindness and bad torturous turns for him After his life is saved yet again he is brought back to his true love and performs a double murder He takes the two women to the New World in hopes of I was surprised, Candide is a short novel, but is jammed packed with adventures and devastation.The philosophy that was instilled on Candide who is down to earth is All things happen for good and There is no effect without a cause He joins the Bulgarian Army and from there life takes good from kindness and bad torturous turns for him After his life is saved yet again he is brought back to his true love and performs a double murder He takes the two women to the New World in hopes of a new life Where life serves him the same plate as before He decides to return to Venice and life again serves up a horrendous amount of Not again and This guy never catches a break Finally in the end he buys his true love, ugly and beaten, and the old women He purchases a Turkish farm and they all live there as a family The satire on relationships, money, religion and the evilness of people is what the story is about One would think a religious person would always live a spiritual and sacred life, not One raised affluent would always live that life and never be treated as a slave You are led to believe characters are killed, but come back later, unexpected My conclusion from the read is The experiences in life whether good or bad are what makes us a well rounded soul


  8. Laurien Laurien says:

    I only read Candide but I feel like that s enough Voltaire for now, although I did enjoy exploring the text in detail His use of satire and intelligent vocabulary makes for an enjoyable read, but knowing the background information kinda completes the experience A good read for my course yay


  9. Matthew Matthew says:

    There may be some dispute about what the purpose of philosophy should be, but one strong contender is that it should be about seeking the good life and finding happiness In this selection of stories, Voltaire, the philosopher s anti philosopher, shows many characters seeking happiness in different ways, and we get to see just how elusive that happiness is.This volume comprises six stories Candide is of course the most famous one, and tells the tale of a young man dismissed as a servant and for There may be some dispute about what the purpose of philosophy should be, but one strong contender is that it should be about seeking the good life and finding happiness In this selection of stories, Voltaire, the philosopher s anti philosopher, shows many characters seeking happiness in different ways, and we get to see just how elusive that happiness is.This volume comprises six stories Candide is of course the most famous one, and tells the tale of a young man dismissed as a servant and forced to fend for himself in the world He is accompanied by an optimistic philosopher called Pangloss who believes that we live in the best of all possible worlds, but this is constantly belied by the series of terrible disasters and atrocities that are experienced or witnessed by Candide and his companions.Micromegas is a shorter story about giants from outer space who commune with the philosophers of Earth The story ends in a discussion about the soul, in which the giants laugh at thearrogant pretentions to human superiority that are expressed.Zadig is the tale of a philosopher who keeps hoping that the pursuit of virtue will bring him happiness, but he passes from one misfortune to another He finally reconciles himself to the notion that everything is intended for the best a conclusion strangely at odds with Candide , but the tale ends ambiguously with a happy ending, followed by a fewevents that tail off.In the only poem of the collection, What Pleases the Ladies, a knight is helped to glory by an old crone, but she insists on his marrying her and consummating the marriage Though repelled by the old woman, he agrees to do so, and is rewarded when she turns out to be a beautiful fairy.For The Ingenu, we have the tale of a Huron with European blood who is utterly unfamiliar with European customs Attempts are made to educate him into French habits and Catholicism, but the Huron is free from the prejudices of a conditioned upbringing, and is soon able to thinkfreely than this In a second half to the story that is never successfully integrated, we see Saint Yves have sex with an official to secure the release of her lover the Ingenu , and watch her die from guilt and shame.Finally, the book ends with The White Bull Drawing on a traditional tale of a princess seeking to remove a curse on her lover who has been turned into a bull, the story also finds time to include and mock a large number of Biblical stories and characters.Voltaire offers us no final answer about what it is to be happy, but he spends some time exploring the idea, and he certainly has many ideas about what makes us unhappy Happiness in Voltaire s stories generally comes from within, and it is no surprise that the conclusion of Candide shows our hero learning to tend to his own garden Zadig and the Ingenu find greater peace of mind by cultivating their mind through learning and philosophy.However, we must not mistake this for any specific system of philosophy Voltaire is somewhat down on philosophical systems The absurd optimism of Pangloss is constantly belied by the horrors of a tale that includes murder, slavery, robbery, rape and dismemberment Curiously the only thing that makes the appalling events of Candide palatable is Voltaire s seeming callousness towards his characters The tale is told in a matter of fact way, and we are encouraged to laugh at the catalogue of atrocities, and to ridicule the foolishness of our heroes.Zadig s optimism about virtue is also seen to be misplaced, and a large part of his story is spent seeking to find a golden mean between two forms of virtuous behaviour that both seem to get him into trouble In Micromegas too, philosophers are reduced to absurdity They are figures so small that the giants do not even realise the planet is inhabited at first, but they still have inflated ideas about the importance of humanity.It may seem strange that a philosophical writer such as Voltaire should seem to have such a low opinion of many fields of philosophy but actually this is quite characteristic Many academics and intellectuals devote a large part of their writings to debunking the work of their colleagues.The ultimate limit of philosophy however is that happiness is frequently unobtainable for Voltaire s characters because they are at the mercy of external forces At best, they can find a way of becoming resigned to their fate, and avoid making their misfortunes worse by their own actions.It is in this field that Voltaire s satirical bent is given full sway As is typical of satirists however, his eagerness to reduce everything to absurdity risks losing sight of all principles, even the ones that he believes in.For example, Voltaire believed in the need for strong government, but his portrayal of rulers in his stories is not a favourable one Many of the appalling happenings portrayed in Candide were true historical events, and needed only a little exaggeration In The White Bull, the tyranny and insecurity of monarchy is stressed so much that it is hard not to feel that it unconsciously presages the French Revolution, which was soon to happen.In his portrayal of religion, Voltaire also goes perhaps further than he intended Voltaire does not appear to have been an atheist, but he inadvertently makes a good case for it His works are fiercely anti clerical, and a number of corrupt or inept clergymen are dotted throughout the stories They are seen giving poor education, or seeking to seduce women.The White Bull ridicules Old Testament stories and reduces them to the level of absurd myths similar to those of Greek legends The constant misfortunes of the characters in Candide, Zadig and other tales also fail to suggest an orderly universe controlled by a benevolent being In The Ingenu, Voltaire writes It is an absurdity, an outrage against the human race, an attack on the Infinite and Supreme Being, to say There is one truth essential to man, and God has hidden it Voltaire here comes closest to acknowledging the absurdity of believing in a god that commands a single truth open to all, but somehow fails to make this known to us However, he cannot quite follow through this obvious conclusion, and soon shies away from it.While Voltaire s views were certainly advanced in many ways, they are still somewhat behind our own thinking at least what we now consider advanced He is occasionally anti Semitic His portrayal of women is often dubious too When the riddle of What Pleases the Ladies is revealed, it turns out that it is love of power There are also plenty of fickle and faithless women in Voltaire s stories, with only a few virtuous ones.Not that Voltaire s morality is too narrow minded When Saint Yves agrees to have sex with Saint Pouange in order to obtain the release of the Ingenu, and then dies from the shame, Voltaire clearly feels that she iswrong to give way to guilt than she was to perform the sexual deed There is no sense here of a woman corrupted forever by sex, and if she had confessed her action to Hercules the Ingenu , it is clear that he would not have condemned her.Voltaire s works are not for those who are seeking good characterisation, and stories in which you care for the people in them However, they are fascinating intellectual studies that offer amusing subversions of popular genres He is certainly never dull, and the stories brim with erudition and interesting ideas


  10. Crishell Crishell says:

    My copy includes these stories Candide of course MicromegasZadigThe IngenuThe White BullAmong all five stories, my favourite is the The Ingenu because it was simple and yet concise and very meaningful Candide and Zadig are two similar stories in my opinion the ideas and wits are the same I enjoyed every bit of Voltaire s witty short stories It s not that FUNNY like The Family Guy or SNL type of humour by today s modern world but it must have been a good laughing experience reading Volt My copy includes these stories Candide of course MicromegasZadigThe IngenuThe White BullAmong all five stories, my favourite is the The Ingenu because it was simple and yet concise and very meaningful Candide and Zadig are two similar stories in my opinion the ideas and wits are the same I enjoyed every bit of Voltaire s witty short stories It s not that FUNNY like The Family Guy or SNL type of humour by today s modern world but it must have been a good laughing experience reading Voltaire at the time it was first published It remains significant because we are still living in a world which believes in the institution of the Church or religion and that ever unchanging absurdity of our social systems and norms There are things in life that will remain forever significant, and this is one worthy of that recognition As long as the world and its people live, there will always be irrational pursuit and a belief that defies common sense.PS If you want to know education in my country, you only have to visit our local bookshop the National Bookstore and you will find Voltaire s Candide next to The Bible


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Candide, and Other Romances. Translated by Richard Aldington, with an Introd. and Notes. Illustrated by Norman Tealby [PDF / Epub] ☆ Candide, and Other Romances. Translated by Richard Aldington, with an Introd. and Notes. Illustrated by Norman Tealby Author Voltaire – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk Publisher London Murrays Book Sales Publication date Notes This is an OCR reprint There may be numerous typos or missing text There are no illustrations or indexes When you buy the General Books edit Publisher London Murrays Book Sales Publication Other Romances. PDF Ë dateNotes This is an OCR reprint There may be Candide, and ePUB ↠ numerous typos or missing text There are no illustrations or indexes When you buy the General and Other Romances. Kindle ´ books edition of this book you get free trial access to Million books where you can select fromthan a million books for free You can also preview the book there.

    Candide, and Other Romances. Translated by Richard select fromthan a million books for free You can also preview the book there."/>
  • Paperback
  • 112 pages
  • Candide, and Other Romances. Translated by Richard Aldington, with an Introd. and Notes. Illustrated by Norman Tealby
  • Voltaire
  • English
  • 14 December 2019
  • 1152506978

About the Author: Voltaire

Complete works , Age of Other Romances. PDF Ë Enlightenment leader Francois Marie Arouet, known as Voltaire, was Candide, and ePUB ↠ born in Paris Jesuit educated, he began writing clever verses by the age of He and Other Romances. Kindle ´ launched a lifelong, successful playwriting career in , interrupted by imprisonment in the Bastille Upon a second imprisonment, in which Francois adopted the pen name Voltaire, he was released after agreeing to move to London There he wrote Lettres philosophiques , which galvanized French reform The book also satirized the religious teachings of Rene Descartes and Blaise Pascal, including Pascal s famed wager on God Voltaire wrote The interest I have in believing a thing is not a proof of the existence of that thing Voltaire s French publisher was sent to the Bastille and Voltaire had to escape from Paris again, as judges sentenced the book to be torn and burned in the Palace Voltaire spent a calm years with his deistic mistress, Madame du Chatelet, in Lorraine He met the year old married mother when he was In his memoirs, he wrote I found, in , a young woman who thought as I did, and decided to spend several years in the country, cultivating her mind He dedicated Traite de metaphysique to her In it the Deist candidly rejected immortality and questioned belief in God It was not published until the s Voltaire continued writing amusing but meaty philosophical plays and histories After the earthquake that leveled Lisbon in , in which , people perished and another , were wounded, Voltaire wrote Po me sur le d sastre de Lisbonne Poem on the Lisbon Disaster But how conceive a God supremely good Who heaps his favours on the sons he loves, Yet scatters evil with as large a hand Voltaire purchased a chateau in Geneva, where, among other works, he wrote Candide To avoid Calvinist persecution, Voltaire moved across the border to Ferney, where the wealthy writer lived for years until his death Voltaire began to openly challenge Christianity, calling it the infamous thing He wrote Frederick the Great Christianity is the most ridiculous, the most absurd, and bloody religion that has ever infected the world Voltaire ended every letter to friends with Ecrasez l infame crush the infamy the Christian religion His pamphlet, The Sermon on the Fifty went after transubstantiation, miracles, biblical contradictions, the Jewish religion, and the Christian God Voltaire wrote that a true god surely cannot have been born of a girl, nor died on the gibbet, nor be eaten in a piece of dough, or inspired books, filled with contradictions, madness, and horror He also published excerpts of Testament of the Abbe Meslier, by an atheist priest, in Holland, which advanced the Enlightenment Voltaire s Philosophical Dictionary was published in without his name Although the first edition immediately sold out, Geneva officials, followed by Dutch and Parisian, had the books burned It was published in as two large volumes Voltaire campaigned fiercely against civil atrocities in the name of religion, writing pamphlets and commentaries about the barbaric execution of a Huguenot trader, who was first broken at the wheel, then burned at the stake, in Voltaire s campaign for justice and restitution ended with a posthumous retrial in , during which Parisian judges declared the defendant innocent Voltaire urgently tried to save the life of Chevalier de la Barre, a year old sentenced to death for blasphemy for failing to remove his hat during a religious procession In , Chevalier was beheaded after being tortured, then his body was burned, along with a copy of Voltaire s Philosophical Dictionary Voltaire s statue at the Pantheon was melted down during Nazi occupation D Voltaire , pseud nimo de Fran ois.