Men Went to Cattraeth PDF ☆ Men Went eBook ☆

Men Went to Cattraeth PDF ☆ Men Went eBook ☆

Men Went to Cattraeth [Reading] ➶ Men Went to Cattraeth By John James – Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk The dark ages are agian brought to life, in all their splendour of epic deeds and heroic characters It is a century or since the Legions left Britain, and the land is menaced by Savages the Saxon mara The dark ages are agian brought to life, in all their splendour of epic deeds and heroic characters It is a century or since the Legions left Britain, and the land is menaced by Savages the Saxon marauders from over the shallow sea, who ahve burned the great forests and destroyed the last flicker of Roman civilisation south of the Wall So Mynydig, King of Eiddin, has rasied a war band of three hundred warriors, who will ride south through the devastated Men Went eBook ☆ lands to the blood and glory of Cattraeth.


10 thoughts on “Men Went to Cattraeth

  1. Howard Wiseman Howard Wiseman says:

    A dark vision of the dark ages, brilliantly imaginedThis is an historical novel NOT fantasy , which intersects with the story of Arthur NOT King of the Britons, but which tells a different tale It it the tale of the battle of Cattraeth probably Catterick in Yorkshire , generally dated to the late 6th century However, like so much else in this period, this dating is debatable, and James chooses to set it much earlier around 491 seems to be indicated on p.8 , when Arthur is still a toddler A dark vision of the dark ages, brilliantly imaginedThis is an historical novel NOT fantasy , which intersects with the story of Arthur NOT King of the Britons, but which tells a different tale It it the tale of the battle of Cattraeth probably Catterick in Yorkshire , generally dated to the late 6th century However, like so much else in this period, this dating is debatable, and James chooses to set it much earlier around 491 seems to be indicated on p.8 , when Arthur is still a toddler Apart from this, the story follows a conventional interpretation of the poem of Aneirin, which is the only account of the battle SPOILERS FOLLOW 300 or so British horsemen, feasted for a year by Mynydog of Eiddin Edinburgh , rode to war against the Anglo Saxons of Northumbria, and ultimately to their death at Catterick.The novel is the first person recollection of Aneirin, one of the few Britons who survived the battle, and is very dark in tone War and the clash of cultures are its themes, but Aneirin reveals snippets of the bigger story, from the coming of the Saxons in the time of Vortigern to the triumph of Arthur.James descriptions of war and genocide are horrifying to modern sensibilities It was obvious to me if not all the reviewers here that James shares our horror, and sympathizes with the Saxons, even while he skillfully maintains Aneirin s Dark Age sensibility and anti Saxon polemics throughout As in Parke Godwin s Arthurian novels, James makes much of the difference between British and Saxon societies, but in evenextreme ways The aristocratic Britons are a free spritited warrior society, but also poetic The true aim of a kingdom is to nurture poets says their war leader Aneirin and his comrades despise the Savages for having a so called King who does manual work alongside his subjects, and for the way they kill and clear the forests to grow wheat the evil plant , to support a dense population of bread eaters When Aneirin makes it back to British territory, he celebrates how he can hunt for his dinner again, eating as a free man food gained not by sweat and labour of hands but by guile and skill There is a tragic irony in the novel greater than the optimism of the doomed expedition to Catterick Anerin and the Britons steadfastly conceive of themselves as Romans, and their ways as civilized ways, whereas the reader recognizes that the Saxons are in many wayscivilized than the Britons Aneirin says the Savages have wizards to conjure their ships together, making the sides firm with planks of oak, because they have not the wisdom to sew leather as civilized people do Even the Britons Christianity is suspect, as they worship the Virgin rather than God or the Christ Despite these dramatic ironies, the heroes of Cattraeth do not die in vain, even by their own terms the last of them die knowing they will be immortalized by Aneirin If we have died only that a poem is made, then we have died for a better thing than ever we lived for While the differences between Saxon and Briton are exaggerated for dramatic purposes, in general the description of life and battle seem authentic, and there are very few obvious errors of fact or slips My only major criticism is that Mynydog s motivation for sending the 300 to their doom, revealed in the last chapter, is not plausible Although it ties the storyclosely to Arthur s rise to power, it weakened the whole book I thought Still a must read for dark age history fans though


  2. Alex Alex says:

    This a fascinating, if highly fanciful, interpretation of the enigmatic Dark Age poem, The Gododdin by Aneirin,a celebrated British bard The fragments of the poem which have survived are written in an archaic Welsh which was the common language of Wales, North England and the Scottish lowlands in this period late 6th century Aneirin was probably a bard at the royal court in Dun Eidinn, present day Edinburgh.The theme of the poem novel is how 300 picked warriors of the Gododdin, the M This a fascinating, if highly fanciful, interpretation of the enigmatic Dark Age poem, The Gododdin by Aneirin,a celebrated British bard The fragments of the poem which have survived are written in an archaic Welsh which was the common language of Wales, North England and the Scottish lowlands in this period late 6th century Aneirin was probably a bard at the royal court in Dun Eidinn, present day Edinburgh.The theme of the poem novel is how 300 picked warriors of the Gododdin, the Men of the North, rode to Cattraeth to do battle with the Anglo Saxon English and were destoyed almost to a man Their defeat was traditionally attributed to over indulgence in strong drink beforehand Given that these are proto Scots we re talking about, this is a not unreasonable supposition but we must not ignore the fact they were also seriously outnumbered Nothing is now known of when and where the battle took place but Cattraeth is usually associated with Catterick in North Yorkshre, now, ironically, a large Army camp The author takes these few tantalising scraps and weaves a compelling tale of heroic sacrifice, treachery, and violent death from them Most interesting is his contrast and compare approach to the Celtic and Saxon mind sets The Celts are portrayed as nature loving poetic, if given to extreme violence at the drop of a hat, the Saxons as dull little farmers whose chief aim in life is to destroy the natural woodland cover of Britain in order to plant wheat and reardull little farmers There is a certain melancholy if you are a descendant of the defeated in knowing how the story inevitably ends i.e with lots and lots of the descendants of the dull little farmers esconced in lands that are lost now Cattraeth is one of the great might have beens of British history If the Gododdin had been just a tadtemperate we might have been spared cricket and Maggie Thatcher.This is an old book now published in 1969 originally but it s worthwhile looking out for a copy as it s a highly entertaining read, especially if you re from the Celtic fringe and can gleefully reflect on the fact that,despite the best efforts of those dull little farmers, we are still here and as intemperate as ever


  3. Meredith McGhan Meredith McGhan says:

    This story is told in the first person, by Aneirin, the bard of ancient Britain who is said to be the author of Y Gododdin Some scholars claim this is the oldest poem of Britain, written in the fifth or sixth century in the language that evolved into Welsh, Cornish and Breton There is considerable robust debate among academics about just who the men of the ancient Brittonic kingdom of Gododdin were fighting at Cattraeth In this book, they are fighting the savage Saxon invaders, and the book d This story is told in the first person, by Aneirin, the bard of ancient Britain who is said to be the author of Y Gododdin Some scholars claim this is the oldest poem of Britain, written in the fifth or sixth century in the language that evolved into Welsh, Cornish and Breton There is considerable robust debate among academics about just who the men of the ancient Brittonic kingdom of Gododdin were fighting at Cattraeth In this book, they are fighting the savage Saxon invaders, and the book does contain depictions of violence and unabashed hatred of the Brittonic tribe for the Saxons, to the point where entire villages are slain Even so, Aneirin is a sympathetic narrator and I was intrigued by how the author tied Y Gododdin to the myth of king Arthur At the end I was left with a melancholic feeling, but a greater understanding of the Early Historic period s warrior culture and their rather heathen brand of Christianity, which the author envisioned as worship of the Holy Virginthan of Jesus or God I thought it was a nice touch that the Gododdin thought of themselves asRoman than the Romans It s quite plausible that this was the case in the decades after the legionaries pulled out of Britain And this is one of the few books that shows the Picts as the Britons they were, rather than barbarians speaking a non Indo European language One thing that remains a mystery is why this book was marketed as fantasy Refreshingly, it s a straight up historical novel with no dragons or spells I will definitely look for other works by John James


  4. Michelle Brass Michelle Brass says:

    I m a sucker for this kind of book The author has built a novel from the epic of the Gododdin The setting in dark age Britain is well done and Aneirin s voice and perspective feel right I read the Kindle version and while I m grateful to the publisher for making this out of print book available at a good price, there were some errors and missing words.


  5. Francis Hagan Francis Hagan says:

    I remember reading thisthan once in my early twenties and being struck by how beautifully it captured the elegiac tone of the period.Re reading it now for the first time in over 30 years only reinforces how well written and powerful this work is There is a sadness and poignancy in the writing which both manages to capture the heroism of the northern British while also starkly revealing their flaws and ignorance Men Went To Cattraeth stands as a testimony to the times in Britain when th I remember reading thisthan once in my early twenties and being struck by how beautifully it captured the elegiac tone of the period.Re reading it now for the first time in over 30 years only reinforces how well written and powerful this work is There is a sadness and poignancy in the writing which both manages to capture the heroism of the northern British while also starkly revealing their flaws and ignorance Men Went To Cattraeth stands as a testimony to the times in Britain when the early English were arriving and the old remnants of the sub Roman states and federate tribes were reeling back in despair but , it takes you into the subtle mind of a poet imbued with the ethos of the time and the horror which awaits him far south in the lost lands about Catterick.Few novels, I think, survive re reading in your later years to still capture the thrill you felt when you first read them This is one of those few


  6. Steve Switzer Steve Switzer says:

    Perhaps the nearest evocation of what it may have been like to have been in a celtic warband during the Saxon takeover of lowland BritainBetter even than Cornwalls Warlord chronicles this has the missing heartbeat of the mournful celtic bard woven into it farconvincinglyConsidering when it was written it is somehow just as convincing now as then rather like alfred duggans ability to remain relevant throughout the ensuing years


  7. Brendan Howlin Brendan Howlin says:

    Interesting Arthurian romance


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